How long will my nipples & the lower halves of my breasts be numb? Is it common to have a lot of swelling to the axillary area?

Had bilateral mastoplexy on Aug 11 2016. Had 400 grams removed from right breast(lumpectomy and radiation done 8 years ago) and 586 grams from the left. The underside of both have some pitting edema and are pinkish in colour and are numb. My right breast is also quite pink on the outer aspect (from the 9 to 11 position). No drainage. Scars are coming along although thick and puckered in places

Doctor Answers 2

How long will my nipples & the lower halves of my breasts be numb? Is it common to have a lot of swelling to the axillary area?

Thank you for your question. This is a complicated question and no real answer can be offered without knowing the details of your diagnosis and your reconstruction as well as having an in-person physical examination. You need to stay in touch with your plastic surgeon and follow his or her recommendations on how to care for your surgical results best. That being said, most patients have some numbness in the breast after procedures such as these. This numbness often returns with time but can take several months to a year to recover. Some patients will still have some small areas of permanent numbness. At this point, it sounds as if you are only 3+ weeks out from surgery and you need to wait until at least 3 months post-op to start critically looking at your results.Hope this helps! 


Spokane Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

Postoperative redness after breast lift

It is common to get redness and swelling of radiated breast tissue after surgery.  This will take longer to subside than the non-radiated side. Make sure you are following up with your plastic surgeon for evaluation and reassurance. Best, Dr. Yegiyants

Sara Yegiyants, MD, FACS
Santa Barbara Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 11 reviews

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