Should I get under eye fillers? (photos)

I hate my under eye hollows, my left eye is smaller and my crows feet. What should I have done?

Doctor Answers 5

Photographing under eye hollows. Treating under eye hollows. Treating crows feet

CORRECT PHOTOGRAPHY FOR ASSESSING UNDER EYE HOLLOWS- Tilt your head down so that chin rests on your chest. Move your eye gaze as high up as you can and take a selfie of the lower lid area. This is the view that a seasoned physician asks for to assess under eye hollows. CORRECTION OF UNDER EYE HOLLOWS- Volume correction of under eye hollows can be done with certain HA's. Namely HA's that are not HYDROPHYLIC and HYGROSCPIC (water loving) and don't attach to water and cause swelling after injecton. Unfortunately, the appropriate fillers with these characteristics have not yet been FDA approved in US. However, a seasoned expert injector knows how to manipulate the existing fillers to accommodate under eye filling. My favorite for this area is Voluma. Sister products to Voluma including Volbella and Volift which are coming to US in the near future will be even more favorable when available.CORRECTION OF CROWS FEET- Dynamic wrinkles ( lines that form with movement and are not there when muscle is not contracted) in the crows feet area should be treated to prevent them from becoming Static wrinkles (wrinkles that are etched into the skin and present for the rest of your life). The paradigm shift that seasoned expert physicians have accepted is that we have changed strategies from just combating wrinkles after they have happen within our practices to preventing wrinkles from ever happening and becoming etched. 


Corona Del Mar Physician
5.0 out of 5 stars 6 reviews

A little botox and a little less filler

Thanks for the great photos and questions. In my opinion, I agree that botox for the crow's feet is the way to go. It will help soften those lines and may even get rid of some of those wrinkles completely. I would be more cautious about placing too much filler underneath your eyes. Part of what you see under your eye when you smile is part of your orbicularis oculi muscle. It's a muscle like a purse string so when you smile it constricts and causes some of those thin bands under your eyes. Be very selective about who you let inject under your eyes as this can be a very difficult area to inject. It's your face, know who's injecting it! Best of luck in you area!~Dr. Sieber

Fillers under the eyes

Hey, thanks for your question.  Great photos, too!!!  I think you would be a great candidate for botox to the crowsfeet and also filler to the under eyelid area/cheek to give a more youthful appearance to your face.  Please find a qualified injector in your area to do these procedures.  Good luck.

Paul E. Goco, MD
Nashville Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.4 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

Tear trough filler?

Hello, and thanks for your question and photos. I do think you are an excellent candidate for placement of a hyaluronic acid filler in your tear troughs. This is one of my favorite procedure to perform, personally, as patients instantly look more rested. In order to determine the best treatment plan for you, I recommend an in-person consultation with a well-trained dermatologist or plastic surgeon. Best of luck, Dr. Frucht.   

Corey Frucht, MD, PhD
Santa Barbara Dermatologic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 4 reviews

Under eye fillers

Hi Trixie31. A combination of fillers and Botox is great for relaxing the crow's feet and getting rid of the under eye bagginess. A product like Belotero or Juvederm, when done by an experienced injector in the tear trough area, gives you a beautiful result blending the cheek with the lower eyelid. Botox then helps to relax the smile lines in the corner of the eye. In addition, make sure you are sleeping 7 hours and staying away from salty foods. This will make you look and feel great!. Good luck.

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