Deep hole at anchor incision. It's dark at the bottom, is it my implant?

I had a breast lift with implants four weeks ago. A small hole appeared at the bottom of my anchor scar. The hole got deeper. I was told to keep it clean,dry and pack with gauze. Today it wept yellow fluid into my dressing I can see something dark and the bottom of the hole. Is it my implant? If it is will my hole heal or will I have to have it removed. I have had no fever, redness or sign of infection at all. I had this done to correct asymmetrical breasts. It could be worse than before.

Doctor Answers 10

Surgery

Hello dear, thanks for your question and provided information as well.. I have to say that without pictures it is a bit difficult for me to tell you exactly what is the problem, but besides that I recommend you to clean and wash well your incisions, clean them with gauze and keep them out of touch, close them and put antibiotic cream everyday.. Contact your surgeon to show what's happening there, wounds can open very easilly after a BA with lift..


Dominican Republic Plastic Surgeon
4.6 out of 5 stars 358 reviews

Implant exposure

From your story I am very concerned that you have exposure of your implant. Please see your PS as soon as possible. Hopefully I am wrong!

Implant extrusion?

From your description, you may have implant extrusion.  However, in-person examination will be needed to verify it.  Please visit your plastic surgeon ASAP.  When caught early, wash out and implant exchange can salvage the augmentation.
Best regards.

Dark place at bottom of scar

 With the story you are telling, and the yellowish fluid that you're seeing, I'm suspicious that the implant is exposed and that is the dark color they are seeing. There are good ways of salvaging an exposed implant without removing it as the first order of business. Go back to your plastic surgeon to discuss. Don't delay. Good luck.

Marc J. Salzman, MD, FACS
Louisville Plastic Surgeon
4.7 out of 5 stars 43 reviews

Possible issue.

 Thank you for your question. Based on your description . It is possible that you have an exposed implant..  This type of incision however is notorious for delayed healing. Perhaps you just have an open area. You should consult with your surgeon for clarification. it is important for you to understand however that worst case scenario oh the implant must be removed. Replacement of the implant however can still take  place and give you a fantastic result.  Best of Luck!

M. Scott Haydon, MD
Austin Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 84 reviews

Hole at bottom of breast with darkness

What you mention is definitely suggestive of an opening with exposure of your implant.  This can often be salvaged with quick, aggressive treatment so contacting your surgeon to be seen asap is essential.  The sooner the better to prevent worsening, infection, etc.   Best of luck !

Justin M. Jones, MD
Oklahoma City Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 40 reviews

It could indeed be your implant

An in person exam is needed to determine the nature of dark thing you see in your incision.  See your surgeon right away.  

Vasdev Rai, MD
Dallas Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 22 reviews

Exposure

Thank you your question and you should see your surgeon ASAP as it maybe your implant

Dr Corbin

Frederic H. Corbin, MD
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 59 reviews

Breast wound

Please call your surgeon ASAP.  An exposed implant is an immediate concern.  I hope it is not your implant that you see and good luck.  

Deep hole at anchor incision. It's dark at the bottom, is it my implant?

Dear Scaredboobs,
That scares me too and you had better call your surgeon and be seen ASAP. It is tough for you to really get a good look because of the location, and your surgeon should really be the one to evaluate it. I'm sorry, but you describe a real bummer of a situation if your implant is exposed.
Best of luck to you,

Stacey Folk, MD
Denver Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 23 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.