Can I get a flat tummy with an umbilical float my PS referred to the abdominoplasty as a hybrid?

Getting a tummy tuck but not enough skin, was told by my PS that the floating belly button would be a great option for me. Is this a common procedure?

Doctor Answers 2

Floating belly button

I like to think that most plastic surgeons try to personalize care to their patient's needs, and it is certainly true that not every patient requires a standard abdominoplasty to achieve a smooth, flat abdominal wall.  A short scar tummy tuck with an umbilical float may be appropriate for patients with limited skin excess, an umbilicus that is centered or above-center on the abdominal wall, and associated muscle laxity.  Consider discussing your concerns and reservations with your operative surgeon so they can review the rationale for their recommendation or seek another opinion from a Board Certified Plastic Surgeon.  Best of luck!

Fairfax Plastic Surgeon
4.3 out of 5 stars 38 reviews

Anesthesia Choices for Breast Enlargement

There are 2 generally accepted types of anesthesia for a breast enlargement: general anesthesia, in which you are fully asleep, or local anesthesia with intravenous sedation, so-called "twilight".  Now that implant placement is usually behind the pectoral muscle, most surgeons use general anesthesia, which I believe keeps the patient pain-free and allows the surgeon to work efficiently without interruption.  Years ago, when implants were placed behind the breast but in front of the muscle more often, then I sometimes injected local anesthesia, performed nerve blocks, and sedated the patients.  However, I have found that working behind the muscle, the preferred placement, really does require general anesthesia for reliable, sustained patient comfort.  Also, injecting local anesthetic for nerve blocks is not without risk of excess bleeding.  Be sure to discuss these options with your surgeon.

Richard G. Schwartz, MD
West Palm Beach Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 24 reviews

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