I have 2 puckers in my skin in the incision line 12 weeks post op face lift. Is this normal?

Just have it on one side but have had sleepless nights stressed out about this. Photo attached - actually only one shows here but have 2. Very noticeable.

Doctor Answers 7

Pucjers post face

I would not worry about this.I think heat,massage and some time will allow this to go down.Sit tihght and be patient.


Fort Myers Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 56 reviews

Contour irregularities after facelift-the trend is important.

 Due to swelling there are always some contour issues after a facelift. If these abnormalities are improving from week to week there's nothing to worry about.

Vincent N. Zubowicz, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 32 reviews

Incision puckering after a facelift

Facelift rearranges deep tissues and skin.  This can leave some temporary puckers around the incisions, nearly all subside considerably within 6 months. In unlikely event you still have visible pucker after that time, a rather simple scar revision could very well correct this.  Do not stress yourself over small things, try to enjoy the overall result and concentrate on the bitg picture.

Boris M. Ackerman, MD
Newport Beach Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 52 reviews

Pucker

The face lift can create pucker areas or indents where skin and muscle layer pulled or advanced.   NO. WORRY.   We have patients wait 6 months minimum and can revise if needed.  Brief procedure under local.   Focus on how great you look.   

Mark Mandell-Brown, MD
Cincinnati Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 51 reviews

Facelift incision

I think its really difficult to tell on this pictures but in general I would tell you that at 12 weeks, your face is still healing and resolving from your facelift procedure.  Best to just show your surgeon and just monitor and should improve with time. Good luck.

Khashayar Mohebali, MD, FACS
Bay Area Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 10 reviews

There Is A Time For Many Words, And There Is Also A Time For Sleep

My advice to you is to focus on getting some more sleep! At twelve weeks postop, you are certainly not completely healed from your surgery yet.  There can be many factors that may influence the appearance of puckering along the line of incision, such as the thickness of the flaps and the vector of the pull of the lift. A common reason is the desire of the surgeon to keep the patient's scars as short as possible, and so the excess skin of the flap is "cheated' in its approximation to the wound edge at the time of wound closure, with the knowledge that the tissues will stretch and redrape with time, and most of the puckering should resolve.

Even if there is still a small amount of residual puckering remaining, it can often be improved, or even completely resolved, by noninvasive, or minimally invasive office treatments, such as ulthera or radiofrequency skin tightening.  As a last resort, a small skin excision and resuturing, using local anesthesia could be performed  in the office to remove the last vestige of puckering, but this should not even be considered until at least six months have passed from the time of your surgery, and preferably even longer. In all likelihood, this last option will not even be necessary.  In the meantime, get some sleep!

Peter Lee, MD, FACS
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
4.6 out of 5 stars 47 reviews

Puckers in incision 3 months after face lift.

Thank you for asking about your face lift.

I am sorry you are so distressed.
  • The pucker that shows in the photograph appears to be from swelling in the skin.
  • This will either subside on its own or the incision will need to be revised.
  • This is done in about 12 more weeks, if needed.
Discuss your concern with your plastic surgeon.
  • And if it is causing you severe anxiety, see if your regular doctor can either prescribe something 
  • to help you temporarily or even refer you for supportive counseling.

  Always see a Board Certified Plastic Surgeon

Hope you found this answer helpful. Best wishes.

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.