After a breast augmentation under the muscle, when will I be 100 percent cleared to work in a fast pace, lifting environment?

I have HP 450cc Allergan style 20 under muscle. Under breast incision. I am a server and bartender. I returned to serving at day 20 and felt much pain in my chest with the weight. My job has now said I cannot return to work until I am 100 percent cleared to lift and work in very fast pace environment. I am going to doctors appointment in 5 days ( will be 4 weeks post op at that point) and will ask surgent but wanted to get an Idea of time frame. Please help

Doctor Answers 8

Activity After Breast Augmentation

Patients that have their breast implants placed underneath the pectoralis muscle can typically begin heavier lifting and strenuous activity at approximately 4-6 weeks but this time frame varies for each patient.  It is a good idea that you are seeing your plastic surgeon as he/she is best qualified to to help you make this decision.    

New York Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 21 reviews

Recovery after BBA

I would recommend following your own surgeon's advice regarding safe return to work, and fortunately you already have an appointment.  Most of my patients return to work after about one week, but on modified duties.  It can take 4-6 weeks before they are ready to return to a job that involves a very fast pace or heavy lifting.

Return to full activity after Breast augmentation

In my practice it would be 4 weeks until full unrestricted activity, before that int you are limited to lifting less than 10 lbs.  

Raymond Jean, MD
Philadelphia Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 21 reviews

Breast Augmentation Question

I typically tell patients to slowly start increasing their activities starting at 2 weeks post op. They can progress to full unrestricted activity at 6-8 weeks. Follow your surgeon's advice.

Breast augmentation and recovery

For my patients, the usual course is limited exertion for 3-4 weeks, then light aerobics is permitted, and then at 6-8 weeks, a patient can perform heavy lifting.

Steven Wallach, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
4.1 out of 5 stars 24 reviews

Lifting after breast augmentation

Healing varies person to person.  Generally patients can return to lifting at about 6 weeks after surgery.  You may be sore, so it is best to work up to your normal activity level gradually.  Your surgeon will give you the best advice on this as he/she is most familiar with the details of your surgery.

Camille Cash, MD
Houston Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 28 reviews

Return to strenuous activities after breast augmentation

Thank you for the question.  Part of your time frame for recover and return to activities depends on your surgery details and post operative course.  Your plastic surgeon can advise you best on what they think would be reasonable for you to do, and things to avoid.

Typically, most patients by 4 weeks are ready to return to full activities, including exercise and strenuous work.  That being said, often a gradual return can allow for an easier transition, as you have not been doing those same activities for the past month.  Heavy lifting activities that really involve engaging the chest muscles can take longer than 4 weeks to return comfortably too.  It sounds like you might have done just a bit too much too soon, and should start to feel more comfortable with those activities over the next few weeks.

Best Wishes,

Alex Seal, MD, FRCSC
Vancouver Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

Breast augmentation and getting back to work

I understand your concern. I usually advise my patients to return to vigorous workout or physical job after 4 weeks.  Those are fairly large implants under your muscle, so it takes time for the muscle and skin to stretch out. By 6 months they will feel like your very own and you will look great!

Robert M. Tornambe, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 23 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.