An Extra Button in the Nipple? What is It , Why?

I am male, I had a button in both niples when just reached puberty and was told they will go away, sure enough the right side there is no button any more, the left side I am still waiting for it to go away but it is there, no big deal except when feeling cold in the beach or sweeming pool, I know then it can be noticed and I got no answer for it? what is it about? where does it come from?can it be fixed?how? the attached photo shows the button I am talking about. Thank you very much.

Doctor Answers 4

Mass on nipple

This appears to be a cosmetic issue.  The "button" could be removed under local anesthesia in an office setting.  It should not leave a noticeable scar.  I doubt that it will go away at this point so you have to ask yourself whether you would rather have the button or the small scar.


Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 24 reviews

Small soft tissue mass of the areola

These types of nodules on the areola are not unusual.  It can be a supernumerary nipple or a skin tag or cyst.  After an evaluation it can be removed.  

Jeffrey Zwiren, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 16 reviews

Extra nipple ,

This is a known condition that can be treated and be removed surgically with out a conspicuous scar.

Mordcai Blau, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
4.6 out of 5 stars 54 reviews

Surgical removal possible

Gynecomastia is associated with extra breast tissue.  Your photograph suggests that the button might be a small cluster of glandular or ductal tissue of the breast. This button of extra tissue could be removed under local anesthesia with little risk other than the associated scar.  Furthermore, the specimen can be sent to pathology to definitively answer your question as to what it is.

Chen Lee, MD
Montreal Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.