Can PRP injections for face (the Vampire Facelift) be safely done to patients having hepatitis C, no unexpected side effects?

Doctor Answers 1

A blood workup is needed before considering treatment, but a Vampire Facelift® can be done even with chronic medical conditions

Thank you for your question. You ask if the Vampire Facelift® can be performed on someone who has hepatitis C, and are concerned about potential side effects.

I can give you my perspective based on this question about hepatitis C and the use of platelet-rich plasma (PRP). A little background - I’m a Board-certified cosmetic surgeon and Fellowship-trained oculofacial plastic and reconstructive surgeon. I’ve been in practice in Manhattan and Long Island for over 20 years. I’m an active member of the Vampire Facelift® network of physicians, and I’ve been a resource to the media when questions about the Vampire Facelift® arise, often when a celebrity has a related procedure.  I can describe the  evaluation process when when someone comes to us and gives us a history similar to yours.

Let’s first understand a bit of the basics and science around platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and determine if this is the right thing for you. Platelets and the concentration of plasma, which is the vampire part of the procedure, is intended to stimulate the building of collagen, blood supply and the improvement of tissue quality. This results in a beautiful healthy glow to the skin, and also in the  improvement of fine lines and general skin texture and quality. This is based on the science of the effect of platelets, which are the cells of the body activated when you get a cut. So the question I would ask first to a patient for any medical condition is what happens if you get a cut? Does it take longer to heal? Do you have any problems with healing? If you were to cut yourself when shaving or anything else, do you have any issues with healing? If you don’t, then chances are it’s not going to be an issue.

Hepatitis C is a chronic viral infection of the liver. If your hepatitis is very active, then chances are you’re not going to want to do anything because you need to manage your liver inflammation. If your liver function test and other blood work are good, then there should be no issue with having the Vampire Facelift® - you’re drawing your blood, separating the platelets, and having these injections performed in a way that should be no different with anyone else. It is important for the people who perform the procedure to avoid inadvertent contamination or injection of your blood into a staff member. From your perspective, if your goal is to achieve improvement of skin quality, then there should be no objection. If there is a question in your mind about the state of your liver function and general state of health, go to your medical doctor. Have a full blood workup done and bring this to the doctor you are considering to do the procedure for you. From my perspective, this among many other different chronic medical conditions has not prevented people having platelet-rich plasma (PRP) treatments. As long as you have good platelets and they function well, there should be no issue. I hope that was helpful, I wish you the best of luck and thank you for your question.

A blood workup is needed before considering treatment, but a Vampire Facelift® can be done even with chronic medical conditions

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Thank you for your question. You ask if the Vampire Facelift® can be performed on someone who has hepatitis C, and are concerned about potential side effects.

I can give you my perspective based on this question about hepatitis C and the use of platelet-rich plasma (PRP). A little background - I’m a Board-certified cosmetic surgeon and Fellowship-trained oculofacial plastic and reconstructive surgeon. I’ve been in practice in Manhattan and Long Island for over 20 years. I’m an active member of the Vampire Facelift® network of physicians, and I’ve been a resource to the media when questions about the Vampire Facelift® arise, often when a celebrity has a related procedure.  I can describe the  evaluation process when when someone comes to us and gives us a history similar to yours.

Let’s first understand a bit of the basics and science around platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and determine if this is the right thing for you. Platelets and the concentration of plasma, which is the vampire part of the procedure, is intended to stimulate the building of collagen, blood supply and the improvement of tissue quality. This results in a beautiful healthy glow to the skin, and also in the  improvement of fine lines and general skin texture and quality. This is based on the science of the effect of platelets, which are the cells of the body activated when you get a cut. So the question I would ask first to a patient for any medical condition is what happens if you get a cut? Does it take longer to heal? Do you have any problems with healing? If you were to cut yourself when shaving or anything else, do you have any issues with healing? If you don’t, then chances are it’s not going to be an issue.

Hepatitis C is a chronic viral infection of the liver. If your hepatitis is very active, then chances are you’re not going to want to do anything because you need to manage your liver inflammation. If your liver function test and other blood work are good, then there should be no issue with having the Vampire Facelift® - you’re drawing your blood, separating the platelets, and having these injections performed in a way that should be no different with anyone else. It is important for the people who perform the procedure to avoid inadvertent contamination or injection of your blood into a staff member. From your perspective, if your goal is to achieve improvement of skin quality, then there should be no objection. If there is a question in your mind about the state of your liver function and general state of health, go to your medical doctor. Have a full blood workup done and bring this to the doctor you are considering to do the procedure for you. From my perspective, this among many other different chronic medical conditions has not prevented people having platelet-rich plasma (PRP) treatments. As long as you have good platelets and they function well, there should be no issue. I hope that was helpful, I wish you the best of luck and thank you for your question.

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.