9 wks post-op. Experienced a mild hematoma in one breast and it has stopped the breast from "fluffing" and rounding out. (photo)

I experience a mild hematoma in one breast which was not drained as ps was happy it would clear by self (it did) , however although it has dropped fine it is not "fluffing" and rounding out in the area where the bruise once was its staying flat/straight. the opposite breast has rounded and fluffed fine. 

Doctor Answers 4

Hematoma

Thank you for a question.  If one implant fails to drop and non-surgical methods like watchful waiting, massage, and breast bandeau aren't helping, your surgeon might need to do a procedure to reposition the implant.  Your surgeon can discuss the options.

9 wks post-op. Experienced a mild hematoma in one breast and it has stopped the breast from "fluffing" and rounding out.

You should always contact your PS with any concerns as they know more about you and can actually do an exam. From looking at your photos this is likely some scar tissue (contraction of the tissue) caused by the hematoma. Time will help this soften out. Massaging daily will also speed up the process.

Undrained hematoma

In your situation, an undrained hematoma may allow for some scar tissue to form around where the bleeding was. It may take a little longer for this to thin out and not be contributing to holding the implant up and away from settling to the bottom of the pocket. Should an early "capsular contracture" happen, then some surgical release of the scarred area may be necessary to allow the implant to drop and round out. Follow up with your plastic surgeon for advice. Best of luck.

Marc J. Salzman, MD, FACS
Louisville Plastic Surgeon
4.7 out of 5 stars 44 reviews

Undrained hematoma and capsular contracture

It is well known that undrained blood around an implant can predispose to the development of capsular contracture, the hard scar that can form around an implant. Please see your surgeon for an evaluation for this.

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.