Where do I go to get eyelids lifted? (Photo)

Hi, I have really heavy, droopy eye lids and this make me look tired and... well... morbid I suppose. I would love to get get it all lifted up. How much does it cost and where do I go to get it done? What is the procedure called? Is it just an eyelift? Many Thanks

Doctor Answers 6

Where do i go to get eyelids lifted?

From these photos, it looks like you would get a homerun result with an upper lid blepharoplasty. This procedure would make you look more rested and open up your eye. In my experience the most important thing in assuring a quick recovery from blepharoplasty is minimizing bruising and swelling. Bruising is much easier to prevent that to get rid of. I have all my patients ice as much as possible from the time they get home until they go to sleep that first night. And I instruct them to not recline any more than 45 degrees until they go to sleep that night. And stay away from salt. Patients who follow these instructions generally heal very quickly with little or minimal bruising or swelling.  See a board certified  surgeon in your area with an expertise in aesthetic surgery for more information. Good luck with your procedure!



Bay Area Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 44 reviews

Eyelid lift

 An upper blepharoplasty procedure is performed to remove the excess skin creating the hooded look on the upper lids. To accomplish raising the eyebrows, an eyebrow lift is required. For more information and many examples concerning both procedures, please see the link and the video below

William Portuese, MD
Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 129 reviews

Eyelids lifted

You should see a board certified plastic surgeon. You may not only need your upper eyelid skin removed to lift them but also a forehead lift to raise your eyebrows to a better position.

Deborah Sillins, MD
Cincinnati Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 10 reviews

Heavy droopy eyelids

Thank you for the question. It is difficult to determine from your photographs what the issues are. If your eyelids are ptotic (drooping), then you require ptosis repair. If the issue is extra skin, then blepharoplasty is the surgical treatment you require. You might need a combination of both operations. Make an appointment with an oculoplastic surgeon who has a lot of experience with both procedures for a detailed examination and discussion of treatment options. Good luck.

Tired eyes

I would go to aboard certified plastic surgeon or oculopalstics doc and get an uppe r lid blepharoplasty.It is a great operation and you would look so much better getting it done.It is an outpatient procedure.

Robert Brueck, MD
Fort Myers Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 56 reviews

Eyelid Lift

Hello.  Thank you for your question.  The standard treatment for treatment of drooping skin of the upper eyelids is called an upper blepharoplasty, sometimes referred to as an upper eyelid lift.  This involves removal of sagging redundant skin from the upper eyelids, and removal of bulging fat, if indicated.  Some people may also need a brow lift if there is significant drooping of the brow contributing to the problem.  A less common problem is ptosis of the eyelid, which is a malposition of the eyelid margin with respect to the pupil.  This is treated with a ptosis repair.  The cost really depends on the procedures that you need to achieve the goals that seek.  Based on the pictures provided, it is my initial impression that you could benefit from an upper blepharoplasty, and possible brow lift.  I would recommend that you seek a consultation with a board certified surgeon with extensive experience and expertise in facial rejuvenation (Plastic Surgery, Facial Plastic Surgery, General Plastic Surgery, or Oculoplastic Surgery).  They can fully assess your situation and help you to determine the best treatment plan to achieve your goals.  I hope this information is helpful.

Michael Boggess, MD
Nashville Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 33 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.