I have Elhers Danols Syndrome, want to get diastasis repaired. How can repair be reinforced besides mesh?

I have EDS the classical type and have a diastasis recti from breast bone to pubic bone from pregnancy. I am 16 months PP. It is split about 5-6cm wide. I have no extra skin or fat. I do have a really long torso as well. I know that I will probably need some kind of reinforcement in plication of the muscles and I wanted to know what the complications were for using mesh and or aloderm and if there was any other type of reinforcement that could be used.

Doctor Answers 2

Repair of diastasis

  • The risk of mesh is infection requiring removal of the infected mesh,
  • It will probably work better than Alloderm as it does not absorb,
  • Infection is less common when the mesh is put behind the muscle, not on top of it,
  • This makes the surgery longer and more delicate but is probably a good idea.
  • Best wishes.

Tummy tuck

This is an interesting question that will get several responses.  Tissues typically don't hold sutures well with this condition.  Provided a plication could be done the materials for onlay vary from prolene mesh to as you mentioned alloderm or a biologic.  You might be best served by someone experienced in abdominal wall reconstruction and aesthetic plastic surgery.

A tummy tuck can be done as a solitary procedure. Many times the results are enhanced by adding liposuction to the hip and love handle area. A tummy tuck is also done in combination with a breast augmentation in a mommy makeover.

Please find an experienced Board Certified Plastic Surgeon and member of the Aesthetic Society using the Smart Beauty Guide. These Plastic Surgeons can guide you on all aspects of facial surgery, breast augmentation and body procedures including tummy tucks or mommy makeovers!

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.