This piece of thin, flexible translucent thing came out of my R nostril after blowing my nose. What is it? (Photo)

In August, I underwent a Rhinoplasty to fix R sided valve collapse in which a rib graft was used. Additionally, my ENT surgeon n placed a PDS plate to fix a septal perforation. Since surgery, I've had a continuous runny nose. This past week, I developed a cold with a sinus infection, causing large amounts of mucos and the need to blow my nose. Before this came out, my R nostril felt very blocked and air was unable to pass through. Since it came out, my nostril is clear and I'm able to breath through it.

Doctor Answers 1

This piece of thin, flexible translucent thing came out of my R nostril after blowing my nose. What is it? (Photo)

Wow! That is quite a find! That is called silastic sheeting. It is placed in the nose to help it heal after surgery. It is usually removed 1-2 weeks after surgery. No wonder you've had some issues. Your nose will be much happier now! And don't worry, it was not supposed to stay in your nose so it doesn't need to go back in. Definitely let your surgeon know! Hope that helps!


San Diego Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 13 reviews

This piece of thin, flexible translucent thing came out of my R nostril after blowing my nose. What is it? (Photo)

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Wow! That is quite a find! That is called silastic sheeting. It is placed in the nose to help it heal after surgery. It is usually removed 1-2 weeks after surgery. No wonder you've had some issues. Your nose will be much happier now! And don't worry, it was not supposed to stay in your nose so it doesn't need to go back in. Definitely let your surgeon know! Hope that helps!


San Diego Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 13 reviews

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