I am a smoker, can I still have a procedure done?

I spoke to a doctor in the D.R. and she said that I would have to stop smoking to have the surgury performed. It has something to do with blood count. Is this true?

Doctor Answers 5

I am a smoker, can I still have a procedure done?

Yes, you should stop smoking. Each doctor has their own guidelines when it comes to pre and postop instructions. I recommend my patients stop 2 weeks before and 2 weeks after surgery. Consult with a board certified surgeon. 


Toronto Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 425 reviews

Smoker

Dear Ronniefaye, yes you should consider stop smoking at least 3 weeks prior your procedure. Smoking increase your heart rate and blood pressure, also paralyze the cilia in your lungs increasing the amount of mucus and nicotine produces constriction of the vessels affecting the blood supplies interfering with the healing process and the immune system.  The blood count on smokers usually is higher which makes blood thicker increasing the risk to form blood clots. Quitting 24 hrs prior the surgery would improve your heart rate and blood pressure. Quitting 1 week cilia would  recover the movement and quitting 3 weeks would improve the healing process. I always prescribe anti-coagulant medication post-op on my smokers patients and It is important to keep a close follow up with them. Good luck.

Kelvin Eusebio, MD
Dominican Republic Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 26 reviews

Smoking and CosmeticSurgery

There is no question that smoking increases the risk and complication rate for almost any cosmetic surgery. This is due to numerous factors including the blood count, vessel constriction, toxins in the smoke and long term damage. Smoking should be stopped before most procedures and is an absolute in facelift, tummy tuck and body lift procedures.

You should see a board certified plastic surgeon in your area to get a formal opinion through an in-person consultation.
Best of luck,
Vincent Marin, MD
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
MarinAesthetics.com

Vincent P. Marin, MD
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 42 reviews

I spoke to a doctor in the D.R. and she said that I would have to stop smoking to have the surgury performed. It has something t

Smoking is a direct cause of   "periferic vessel constriction" (a nicotine effect), meaning a decay of  the oxygen supply needed for the repair of the tissues involved in the surgery.

Poor blood supply to the tissues can cause a great number of complications from delay of the scaring process, spontaneous opening of the wound, to  the dead of the skin and flap.  

It does not have to do with your blood count, but with the blood supply to the tissues in the surgical area.

Adolfo Sesto, MD
Dominican Republic Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 40 reviews

Smoking and surgery

Smoking increases the complication rate significantly, and in the case of wanting transferred fat to pick up a blood supply it is a good idea to stop smoking to improve the chance of "take."

Steven Wallach, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
4.1 out of 5 stars 24 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.