I'm 3 weeks post gynecomastia surgery. Do I have a hematoma? (Photo)

My right side is completely healed up with no swelling. My left side still has a lumpy spot I wondering if it could be tissue they didn't get or could it still have a some knot like swelling or possibly a small hematoma. I will add a before and after pic

Doctor Answers 7

Assymetry or Swelling Post Op

Asymmetry during the healing process is not at all uncommon after any breast surgery.  Also, your incisions will go through a maturation #process following #Gynecomastia #surgery. For the first few months they will be red and possibly raised and/or firm. As the scar matures, after 6-12 months, it becomes soft, pale, flat, and much less noticeable. You may experience numbness, tingling, burning, “crawling”, or other peculiar sensations around the surgical area. This is a result of the #healing of tiny fibers which are trapped in the incision site. These symptoms will disappear. Some people are prone to keloids, which is an abnormal scar that becomes prominent. If you or a blood relative has a tendency to keloid formation, please inform the doctor.

A collection of fluid under the skin occurs occasionally during the postoperative period. Aspiration of the fluid with a needle is frequently helpful. Secondary surgery is rarely necessary. Bruising and #swelling are normal and usually increase slightly after the removal of any tape or foam. The bruising will decrease over 3-4 weeks, but may last as long as 6 weeks. The majority of the swelling will be gone within the first 3-4 weeks. However, it may take 6-9 weeks to disappear completely. 

Also, as you heal, the area may feel “lumpy” and irregular. This, too, decreases with time, and massaging these areas will help soften the scar tissue. The #compression garment helps reduce the swelling, and the longer it is worn, the more quickly you will #heal. It can also assist in the retraction of the skin.

Orange County Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 94 reviews

Probably just needs more time

it is best to see your surgeon so he can asses you live. 
however it is most likely small and requires no treatment.
Most likely you need to really wait 3 months to allow more 
swelling to resolve etc.

david berman md

David E. Berman, MD
Sterling Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 76 reviews

Lump after gynecomastia surgery

The lump you see may be a hematoma, but there could be asymmetric swelling.  I note some asymmetry between your breasts in your preop photo.  You should see your surgeon to determine if there is a hematoma which could be aspirated.

Bruce E. Genter, MD, FACS
Abington Plastic Surgeon
4.3 out of 5 stars 16 reviews

Small lump on one side after gynecomastia surgery

Thank you for asking about your gynecomastia surgery.

  • I am glad things are otherwise healing well.
  • The lump is likely to be from swelling or a very small hematoma.
  • If there is any bruising or discoloration around it, it is probably a hematoma.
  • I will usually aspirate these hematomas if possible.
  • Please point it out to your surgeon to see if it needs treatment.
Always see a Board Certified Plastic Surgeon.
Hope you find this information helpful. Best wishes.


 The answer to your question is yes. You are still very early in your recovery but you might have a very small hematoma that should resolve without any treatment based on the photo. It also could be retained tissue but that would be less likely.

Gynecomastia and lump

At three weeks you are very early in the healing process. Massage may help, but you should speak with your surgeon.

Steven Wallach, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
4.1 out of 5 stars 24 reviews


You are still in the very early Healing phase for this type of operation. Probably a little early to worry about tissue not being removed. Very common to have swollen and lumpy areas one side worse than the other for a while. The obvious answer is to check back with your doctor. I'm sure it will work it's way out. Good luck.

Sherwood Baxt, MD
Paramus Plastic Surgeon
3.9 out of 5 stars 21 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.