Is this gynecomastia? If it is, what do I do? (Photo)

I'm 16 and I weigh 195 pounds and I'm 5'11. If my nipples are pretty big and soft. If this is gynecomastia, what do I do?

Doctor Answers 12

Consult with a Board Certified Surgeon to Better Determine

According to official statistics, 36% of adult young men and 57% of older #adult men in the United States have this medical condition in one of the four grades. 

About 200,000 to 3 million cases of #gynecomastia are being reported every single year. So if you have #breast #enlargement and you feel you're an exception, please understand that 1 in 3 young adult #men and 1 in 2 older adult men are just like you and have breast enlargement. 
There are three types of surgical treatment options available that treat gynecomastia. Your board-certified plastic surgeon will recommend the type best suited for you. The most important decision to be made before performing any surgical procedure is determining whether you are an ideal candidate. Weight, and more specifically body mass index (BMI), need to be considered when deciding.
Consulting with a board-certified plastic surgeon is highly suggested in order to determine if you are a surgery candidate and what treatments are best for you.


Orange County Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 96 reviews

Puffy nipples

Could be gynecomastia.  I'd want to know more.  How long has it been like that? Best to see your doc and get a diagnosis.  If gynecomastia, sometimes it resolves after puberty.

Tim Neavin, MD
Beverly Hills Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 31 reviews

Is this gynecomastia?

Thanks for your question.  Based on the photos provided the nipples and chest do appear prominent but it is best to see a physician to have a proper chest examination and possibly investigations.  If the diagnosis is confirmed, a plastic surgeon can discuss options to improve the chest contour.

Is this gynecomastia? If it is, what do I do?

I would have to examine you to give you the best recommendation. Look at reviews and before and after pictures as well as credentials to select your surgeon.

Kenneth Hughes, MD

Los Angeles, CA

Male Breast Enlargement is called Gynecomastia

Gyecomastia is Male Breast EnlargementAn exam would be required for the best opinion, but from your photos it seems as if you have gynecomastia. There are varying degrees of gynecomastia ranging from puffy nipple to severe breast enlargement and/or breast sag. The severity of the gynecomastia will determine which treatment option is necessary. In most cases, men suffer from standard gynecomastia, which can be surgically treated as an in-office procedure under local anesthesia. For more severe cases, it may be recommended that you have your procedure under general anesthesia at an outpatient surgery center. Your consultation will determine which option is best suited for treating your gynecomastia.

Is this gynecomastia? If it is, what do I do? (Photo)

It does seem that you do have gynecomastia.  I would recommend waiting until you are 17-18 yrs to allow for you hormonal changes to stabilize before undergoing gynecomastia reduction.  Good luck and be safe.

John T. Nguyen, MD, FACS, FICS
Double Board Certified Plastic Surgeon

John Nguyen, MD, FACS
Houston Plastic Surgeon
4.7 out of 5 stars 71 reviews

YOu do have enlarged breasts

Your enlargement may be due to glandular breast tissue (gynecomastia) or fat collection (pseudogynecomastia).  It's best to be seen by a board certified plastic surgeon.
Gynecomastia is relatively common in teenage boys and very often it resolves itself without any surgery once you get out of your teenage years.

Martin Jugenburg, MD
Toronto Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 425 reviews

Is this gynecomastia? If it is, what do I do?

Thank you for the question. I would suggest that you seek consultation with your primary care physician and/or a board-certified plastic surgeon. Physical examination will be key when it comes providing you with an accurate diagnosis. Based on your description, it is possible that you are dealing with gynecomastia. "Gynecomastia" comes from the Greek meaning "gyne" meaning woman and  "mastos"  meaning breasts.  It refers to abnormal development of large mammary glands in males. Although there may be many “causes”, most cases are idiopathic (no specific cause). The use of certain medications, drugs, organ dysfunction (kidney or liver), hormonal imbalances etc. may also be causative.  Persistence gynecomastia is often best treated with  partial excision of the prominent glandular tissue  as well as liposuction surgery of the peripheral chest area.  If the prominence of the chest wall is caused by adipose tissue liposuction  surgery may suffice. You may find the attached link, dedicated to gynecomastia concerns, helpful to you as you learn more. If/when the time comes for surgical intervention, please make sure that your consulting with board-certified plastic surgeons who can demonstrate significant experience achieving the types of outcomes you would be pleased with. Best wishes.

Gynecomastia Candidate

It does appear that you have gynecomastia. If/when you are ready to address, consult with 3 board certified plastic surgeons to understand your options.

Is this gynecomastia?

Thanks for writing,

It appears as though you have gynecomastia. There are two components to this. True Gynecomastia, has breast tissue behind the nipple, and pseudo gynecomastia which is the surrounding fat that is enlarged due to hormonal affects.
In many cases in young males who have very nice skin, good elasticity and tone, then liposuction will work very well. Sometimes if the breast tissue is to large then this many require surgically removal. The surrounding area ( pseudogynecomastia) can be liposuctioned. A good physical examination by a Board Certified Plastic Surgeon will be very helpful. He/she can give you and your parents all the necessary information to allow you to make the correct choice for you. Good Luck, I hope this helped.

Stephen M. Davis, MD, FACS
Board Certified Plastic Surgeon
Green Hills Plastic Surgeon

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.