I'm looking for advice on fixing orbital asymmetry and eyebrow on left side. Also seem to have nasal deviation on same side.

My left eye has always been smaller & asymmetrical. My deep set eyes are made worse by what appears to be orbital asymmetry? When I had LASIK eye surgery the tool that fit into the right eye socket wouldn't fit into the left. The eyebrow is much lower on the left & my septum is deviated to the left. The left eye also pulls down the lashes so that they are always straight. The left side of my face seems chubbier when I smile the cheek appears larger and seems to push my left eye closed even more.

Doctor Answers 3

I am looking for advice on fixing facial asymmetry and nasal deviation on the same side

Facial asymmetry is normal, and everyone has some degree of it. From the limited photographs, it appears that the nose is crooked, especially in the patient's left mid bridge where the left upper lateral cartilage  is concave. A rhinoplasty procedure can accomplish straightening the crooked nose. This will be accomplished with osteotomies placed in the nasal bones and a left-sided spreader graft to match to the opposite side. For more information  and many examples of crooked nose repair in our practice, please see the link and the video below 


Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 129 reviews

Orbital asymmetry

The orbital asymmetry is unlikely to be related to previous LASIK. The left eye does appears smaller and more sunken. There are different options available. Need consultation. See an oculoplastic specialist. See video below too.

Mehryar (Ray) Taban, MD, FACS
Beverly Hills Oculoplastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 61 reviews

The Spectrum of Facial Asymmetry

Thanks for your question. Everyone has some degree of facial asymmetry... one cheek is wider and one is higher...  small differences can be treated with fillers or implants if necessary. That being said, there are forms of facial asymmetry that are true disorders. For example, there is a condition called "Parry-Romberg" (hemi-facial atrophy - or progressive loss of volume) as well as "hemi-facial microsomia" (one side of face is much smaller than the other)... in both of these disorders, the two faces are vastly asymmetric.  You should seek consultation with a facial plastic surgeon to discuss your options.

Best of luck.

Benjamin C. Paul, MD
New York Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 27 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.