If my operative report states a generous l strut of septum was left, can it be used for Revision Rhinoplasty?

It has been a few months since my surgery and my nose is short and still in a very upturned position. It is also overall much smaller than I wanted/expected. Would this septum be enough to lengthen the nose and then the ears to build up the size - bridge and tip or would rib probably be needed?

Doctor Answers 4

Septal cartilage

A generous "L" strut can mean many different things and may not mean that there is enough for graft material.  Your surgeon might know .


New York Plastic Surgeon
4.1 out of 5 stars 24 reviews

Septal Cartilage for Nasal Revision

You are asking a very basic question about supply and demand. The answer depends on the amount of cartilage left in your septum and what will be needed for your revision. Don't be concerned; there are other sources of cartilage available, such as your ears. 

Richard W. Fleming, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 38 reviews

Can it be used for Revision Rhinoplasty?

Hard to know from the info you have provided alone. If your nose needs to be significantly enlarged, more cartilage than the septum and ear may be needed. Your residual septum is unlikely to have much left but both ears may yeild enough. Otherwise your choices are rib cartilage or an implant. Ask your surgeon for advice. Good luck.

Robert Graper, MD
Charlotte Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 26 reviews

Cartilage for Revision Rhinoplasty

The correct answer depends on how much cartilage remains in your septum and how much cartilage you may need to affect the revision rhinoplasty changes that you desire. Your surgeon can best recommend which source of cartilage is required. Septal cartilage, rib, ear or irradiated rib cartilage options may all be considered, depending on what is needed in your particular case. 

Fred J. Bressler, MD, FACS
Houston Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.