Can someone please help me and tell me if this is normal or not? (photo)

I got my boobs done almost a year ago and everything was fine. Healing Perfectly no issues. Then one boob started having a weird separation and now both do. I am not sure if it is scar tissue build up or not. Please help!

Doctor Answers 9

1 Year Post Op

Hello,
If you have developed new concerns or changes, it is best that you be examined by your Plastic Surgeon in person.
All the best

What is wrong with my breasts a year after breast augmentation.

The picture shows a bilateral slight double bubble deformity, but it is not clear to me that this is the recent changes you are complaining about. You need a proper in person examination to determine what is wrong. If you think that your breasts are recently getting separated from each other, this could be a capsular contraction. If you are complaining of the extra folds under your breasts then it would be a double bubble issue. It would be best to talk to your surgeon or seek a second opinion.

Probable Double Bubble

Dear kayleeullom, This looks like you formed a double bubble. Your surgeon can confirm this with an examination. This can occur when a larger implant is placed on a smaller chest wall or with a short inframammary crease to nipple distance. This is usually correctable and your surgeon can discuss treatment options with you. Good luck. Dr. Gervais.

Douglas L. Gervais, MD
Minneapolis Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 168 reviews

Breast augmentation - implants look odd after a year

Thank you for asking about your breast augmentation.
  • I understand your concern -
  • I don't this this is scar tissue.
  • If it were a capsular contarcture, I would expect the implants to look rounder and higher
  • It looks most a double bubble - 
  • This means the implants are moving downward - usually the result of implants too large for the chest. 
  • Please see your plastic surgeon for a thorough examination and discussion,
  • The usual correction will be a smaller implant, repair of the implant pocket and (sometimes) use of material to support the implant.
Always see a Board Certified Plastic Surgeon. Best wishes  - Elizabeth Morgan MD PHD FACS

Can someone please help me and tell me if this is normal or not for breast implants?

Thank you for your question and photo.  Based on your photo you may be developing double bubble deformity.  This occurs when very large implants require dissection of a very large implant which violates the inframammary crease of the breast.  In most cases a minor revision is necessary.  However he should aster plastic surgeon if a trial of an underwire bra might be helpful. For more information please read below:

Breast Deformity After Augmentation

Not having your original photos to refer to makes it a little hard to tell what is going on.  I dont think you have a "double bubble" in the usual sense.  I think you may have started out with a tuberous breast and now have a capsular contracture on both sides to deal with, but you need an exam and evaluation to see what is really going on.The best person to do that is your original surgeon as he/she knows what you looked like before and since your surgery.

Deborah Ekstrom, MD
Worcester Plastic Surgeon
4.7 out of 5 stars 38 reviews

Breast augmentation outcome

This is likely a double bubble, meaning that revisional surgery would be required.  See your plastic surgeon in follow up to discuss a surgical proposal. Best wishes.

Can someone tell me if this is normal or not?

Thank you for sharing your question and photograph.  Unfortunately at a year out from surgery your current appearance is not normal for a breast augmentation.  It is unclear if capsular contracture is taking place or bottoming out of your implants so see your surgeon for an in-person examination to diagnose the cause of your current outcome and treatment options to correct it.  Hope this helps.

Nelson Castillo, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 43 reviews

Double bubble

You  have a double bubble and in order to improve that you likely need a capsule repair.  Best of luck with your decision to move forward.

Steven Wallach, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
4.1 out of 5 stars 24 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.