3 days post-op, should I be concerned about how much larger my left breast is? (Photo)

Had my mommy makeover on the 21st. Today is a holiday and don't want to call over something that is nothing. Being so soon after surgery, should I be concerned about the vast difference in size?? Worried about infection or something that is causing my left breast to be so much larger....my next appointment isn't until Tuesday. Nothing to be concerned about or?? Any comments would be greatly appreciated!

Doctor Answers 11

Mommy Make

I would contact your PS to gain reassurance. It is likely that there were differences preop that would predict the asymmetry you currently have but only your PS can advise you. 


Manchester Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 142 reviews

Mommy Makeover /Breast Augmentation/Breast Implants/Anatomic Gummy Bear Implants/Tummy Tuck/Liposuction/BBL

I appreciate your question.

I would recommend that you contact your surgeon to discuss your concerns at this time.

The best way to assess and give true advice would be an in-person exam.

Please see a board-certified plastic surgeon that specializes in aesthetic and restorative plastic surgery.

Best of luck!

Dr. Schwartz

Board Certified Plastic Surgeon

#RealSelf100Surgeon

Left Breast Swelling After Augmentation

Thank you very much for your question and photographs. Congratulations on your recent breast augmentation. At three days’ post-op, swelling is common, and can be expected to last for up to six months. If you have any concerns about the post-op swelling or your healing progression, I recommend contacting your operating surgeon for further evaluation.

Paul Vitenas, Jr., MD
Houston Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 104 reviews

Mommy make-over - is the size difference ok?

Thank you for asking about your mommy make-over.

This soon after surgery, you need to contact your own surgeon to discuss any concerns. Only your surgeon knows what was done and only your surgeon can help you if there is a problem.  

Always see a Board Certified Plastic Surgeon. Best wishes  - Elizabeth Morgan MD PHD FACS

Breast Asymmetry 3 Days Post MMO

#Healing will continue for 2-3 months following your #Augmentation or #AugmentationMastopexy procedure. There may be some swelling, bruising, malposition, color differences. Sensation will be abnormal. Scars will also be changing.
But, it can be up to one year see your final result. Your doctor may require you to move or massage the implants within the breast pockets during the #postoperative period. #Textured implants do not require breast massage. You will be informed about this at your post-operative visit.
Also, the two breasts commonly heal quite differently so #assymetry is not unusual. One breast may swell more, feel more uncomfortable, or have a different initial shape. After complete #healing, they will be more similar and natural. You must have patience, but if this causes concern, ask questions of the doctor or the nursing staff.

Jed H. Horowitz, MD, FACS
Orange County Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 96 reviews

Are my asymmetric breasts normal at this point?

Agree that at this stage it is not uncommon to see some mild asymmetry due to swelling and the normal healing process.  Unless you see a dramatic difference (which could signal either a hematoma or seroma) you are probably fine to wait until your appointment on Tuesday.

I hope that helps!

-Gregory A. Buford MD FACS

Board Certified Plastic Surgery

Author:  "Eat Drink Heal:  The Art and Science of Surgical Nutrition"

3 days postop should i be concerned about how much larger my left breast is?

Thank you for sharing your question and photograph.  At this point in your recovery it is quite common to see some asymmetry between your breasts, usually as the result of swelling.  Unless you have noticed some physical change in appearance or sensation, all is likely well and simply allow more time to pass to see steady improvement in appearance.  Hope this helps.

Nelson Castillo, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 43 reviews

Swelling and asymmetry

It is typical for the breasts to be somewhat asymmetrical at this stage.  They will likely continue to heal at different rates throughout recovery.  If you have noticed that the one side has swollen significantly in a short period of time and/or if you notice symptoms such as extreme dizziness, fever, increased tenderness and redness of the breast then you should contact your doctor right away.  Do not be afraid to contact your surgeon's office if you have concerns.  Most surgeons are much happier if you do so that you both can have peace of mind that healing is appropriate.

Camille Cash, MD
Houston Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 29 reviews

Breast healing

Thank you for the question and the photo.  I don't see overt signs of a hematoma and infection is fairly rare this early on plus you don't have any of the signs and symptoms of an infection.  Th asymmetry could certainly be swelling it it might be the tightness of one muscle compared to the other.  I would continue with your current recovery and touch base with your plastic surgeon at your next appointment.

Good luck with the remainder of your recovery.

Dr Remus Repta

Remus Repta, MD
Scottsdale Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 154 reviews

Unequal Breasts following surgery

Early differences in swelling are common so if it's just the size or swelling that is different i wouldn't worry too much. Things to call your surgeon about would be if you have other issues like fever, infection, heavy bloody drainage. But, in my opinion you should never feel bad about calling your Physician's office regardless of holiday, this is what we do and are always happy to answer questions and make sure you are safe. Peace of mind is important too as you recover. Best of Luck!

Robert Heck, MD, FACS
Columbus Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 62 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.