Second time Saline Implant broke, wondering should I go with Silicone since I've had 2 breaks in a little more than 3 years?

I got my first surgery in 2013 and within 9 months (4/2014) my left implant broke.. So I had to have it replaced..My doctor actually replaced both. 9/9/16 I realized my left implant broke again.. So in about 2 1/2 years my second implant broke.Same side..I am now wondering if I should go with silicone since I've had 2 breaks in a little more than 3 years. implants currently are 375 filled to 425..

Doctor Answers 4

Should i change type of implants?

Thank you for your question. Im sorry about your issues with the implants. In regards to type of implant, we use cohesive gel implants (gummy bear implants) for the vast majority of our patients.  The technology is simply excellent and gives a natural look and feel.  Hope this helps.

Silicone after saline rupture

Thank you for your question.  I am sorry to hear about your problems with the saline implants.  It is a little unusual to have 2 ruptures in 3 years, but I have seen this before.  Saline implants do have a higher rupture rate than silicone implants.  If you were a patient in my practice, I would recommend silicone gel because they look and feel more natural compared to saline implants.  Good luck.  

Implant exchange

An option is to go with silicone, but it is unclear why you developed saline ruptures.  Good luck with your surgery.

Steven Wallach, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
4.1 out of 5 stars 24 reviews

Best option after saline breast implant deflations?

I am sorry to hear about the complications you have experienced;  whether or not to exchange to silicone gel breast implants is a decision you should make after carefully discussing (with your plastic surgeon) the pros/cons associated with each  type of breast implant.   Best wishes for a long-term outcome that you will be pleased with.

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.