I had breast aug with a lift but one is still low! Will my doctor redo the surgery or do I have to pay for another? (Photo)

I paid for a lift but I have exactly the same problem just with bigger breast now! I wanted a little smaller but he said I wouldn't get cleavege. I'm 5.5 weight 130lb and he recomended 371cc are they low because they are to big for my body? 3 weeks later one breast is still lower

Doctor Answers 8

BA with lift

Your photos are not uniform and some taken from above downwards which can distort the amount of perceived drooping. My best advice is to select the most qualified procedure rather than the method (see below link for tips on how to do this). Price varies based on where the procedure is done, how long it takes, experience of the surgeon, etc
#breastaugmentation
#breastlift
#Breastliftwithimplants

I had breast aug with a lift but one is still low! Will my doctor redo the surgery or do I have to pay for another?

Hello dear, thanks for your question and provided information as well…
I have to say that you are still early on healing process, it is too soon to determine how your results are going to be, per now, they look very nice and beautiful, you can have one bigger than the other, feel swollen and also have bruises and open wounds, it is normal and that can happen Hello dear, thanks for your question and provided information as well..

Tania Medina de Garcia, MD
Dominican Republic Plastic Surgeon
4.6 out of 5 stars 362 reviews

Breasts low after lift

I would recommend waiting at least 4 months to allow the implants to settle and then reassess. If your scars are only around the areola, the lift you will get from that is minimal to moderate. You may need a more extensive lift to get the look you want.

Paul Wigoda MD
drwigoda.com

Paul Wigoda, MD
Fort Lauderdale Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 26 reviews

Breast lift

You are only a few weeks post-op and any sort of revision would have to wait at least 4-6 months. Yes, your breasts still look a bit low.

Steven Wallach, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
4.1 out of 5 stars 24 reviews

I had breast aug with a lift but one is still low! Will my doctor redo the surgery or do I have to pay for another?

 I am sorry to hear about your concerns after breast augmentation/lifting surgery. As you may know, it is too early to evaluate the final outcome of the procedure performed. This is best done about six months after the procedure was performed.

Policy regarding coverage of expenses for revisionary surgery will vary from office to office and probably on a case-by-case basis as well. Costs of revisionary surgery may range from zero, to anesthesia/surgery center fees, to discounted surgeon's fees.
Generally speaking, patients undergoing elective surgery should understand that complications may arise and that additional expenses (even if the plastic surgeon does not charge for his/her services) may be patient responsibility.

Some general thoughts regarding the combination breast augmentation/lifting surgery may be helpful to you and other patients considering this operation in the future:

Generally speaking, patients who are considering breast augmentation/lifting surgery should understand that this combination surgery is significantly more complex than either one of the procedures done separately. In other words, the combination breast augmentation / mastopexy surgery differs from breast augmentation surgery alone in that it carries increased risk compared to either breast augmentation or mastopexy surgery performed separately.
Furthermore, the potential need for revisionary surgery is increased with breast augmentation / mastopexy surgery done at the same time. This revisionary rate may be as high (or higher) than 20%.
Personally, I find that the breast augmentation/lifting procedure to be one of the most challenging of the breast operations I perform, even compared to somewhat complex revisionary breast surgery. On the one hand, when performing breast augmentation/lifting surgery we are increasing the breast size with breast implants; on the other hand, we are reducing the breast “envelope” in order to achieve the breast lift. These two “forces” must be balanced as perfectly as possible in order to achieve the desired results. Removing too much skin/ breast tissue is problematic; removing too little breast skin/tissue can also be problematic. Remember also that patients presenting for breast lifting surgery and general have lost some skin elasticity/thickness making potential incision line healing problems and/or recurrent drooping/sagging important concerns to communicate.
To achieve a surgical result where the breast implant and breast tissue “come together” and behave like a single breast is one of my goals but can be difficult to achieve. Essentially, we are trying to create a breast implant/breast tissue interface that feels and behaves as naturally ( as a single unit) as possible. Generally speaking, making sure that the breast implant has some sub muscular and some sub glandular component ( dual plane) and tailoring the overlying skin/subcutaneous tissue/breast tissue as precisely as possible over the underlying breast implant is key.
Despite these efforts, breast implants are after all a foreign body that don't necessarily stay where we wish they would; therefore, breast implant related problems such as positioning ( too high, too low, lateral displacement etc.) can occur and may be a reason for returning to the operating room for revisionary breast surgery. I use a “tailor tacking” technique that allows a determination of what breast implant should be used to SAFELY produce the results the patient is looking for. This technique involves use of a temporary sizer and temporary “closure” of the overlying breast skin over the sizer. The use of the tailor tacking technique is very helpful. Breast lifting involves removal of skin ( and tightening of the breast skin envelope) while breast augmentation involves expansion of the breast skin envelope. These 2 forces are counteracting each other. Again, despite these efforts, breast implant and/or tissue/skin complications may arise causing minor or significant complications.
Generally speaking, it is difficult to achieve the “perfect” result with breast augmentation/lifting surgery, despite best efforts. Patients should be aware of the complexity of this combination procedure, achieve REALISTIC EXPECTATIONS prior to proceeding, and understand that additional surgery ( along with the additional recovery time, stress, expenses etc) may be necessary in the short or long-term. Patients should understand that the results of the procedure will not necessarily match aesthetically the results of patients who have undergone breast augmentation surgery only.
For example, some patients who wish to maintain long-term superior pole volume/"roundness" or "implanted look" may find that this result is not achieved after the initial breast augmentation/lifting operation.
An additional operation, possibly involving capsulorrhaphy, may be necessary to achieve the patient's longer-term goals ( with superior pole volume/roundness). It is helpful if patients understand that this breast implant capsule used to provide the support for the breast implant is not present during the initial breast augmentation/lifting operation. The capsule (layer of scar tissue) forms around the breast implant and may be a good source of supportive tissue during revisionary breast surgery, Including correction of breast implant displacement/malposition problems ( such as bottoming out, symmastia, lateral displacement etc).
Potential risks associated with breast augmentation/lifting surgery include infection, bleeding, incision line healing problems, loss/change of nipple/areola complex sensation, and blood flow related issues to causing skin or tissue necrosis. Poor scarring, pigment changes, areola/nipple asymmetry etc. are also potential problems. Again, patients may experience implant related problems such as encapsulation, leakage, displacement problems ( too high, bottoming out, lateral displacement, asymmetric positioning etc.), rippling/palpability of breast implants etc. Patients may also be dissatisfied with breast size, shape, and/or how the breast implants and overlying breast tissues “interface” with one another. Occasionally, a breast implant may even have to be removed and the patient will generally be “implant free” for several months at least. Obviously, this situation can be quite physically, emotionally, and psychosocially stressful to the patient involved.
Given the complexity of the combination breast augmentation/lifting operation and the greater risk of revisionary breast surgery needed, there are good plastic surgeons who will insist on doing the procedures separately. For me, if I see a patient who needs a great degree of lifting, who has lost a lot of skin elasticity, or whose goal is a very large augmentation then I think it is best to do the procedures in 2 stages (in order to avoid serious complications). However, doing the procedure in one stage does increase the risks of complications in general and the potential need for further surgery. This increased risk must be weighed against the practical benefits of a single stage procedure (which most patients would prefer).
Conversely, if I see a patient who requires minimal to moderate lifting along with a small to moderate size augmentation (and has good skin quality), then doing the procedure one stage is much safer. Nevertheless, the potential risks are greater with a 1 stage procedure and the patient does have a higher likelihood of needing revisionary surgery.
Having discussed some of the downsides and potential risks/complications associated with breast augmentation/lifting surgery, most patients (If properly selected and who are doing the operations at the right time of their lives psychosocially) accept the scars associated with breast augmentation/breast lifting surgery as long as they are happy with the improvement in contour, size, and symmetry.
I hope that this summary of SOME of the issues surrounding breast augmentation/lifting surgery is helpful to you and other women considering this procedure in the future.
The attached link may also be helpful. Best wishes.

3 weeks post op, some advices:

Thanks for the question.
Its early to talk about final results.
In my practice, after performing a BA I recommend to my patients to limit the movement of the arms for two weeks. After that, you can move your arms taking care and always with common sense.
In this regard, it's not advisable to carry heavy weights to prevent the implant out of position, and allow the formation of the physiological capsule around the implant, also to avoid pain and breast swelling.
Kind regards,
Dr. Emmanuel Mallol.-

Emmanuel Mallol Cotes, MD
Dominican Republic Plastic Surgeon
4.7 out of 5 stars 179 reviews

I had breast aug with a lift but one is still low! Will my doctor redo the surgery or do I have to pay for another?

In border line lift cases as yours I AWAYS explain to my patients the possible need for a secondary lift surgery! Appears you had ONLY a limited donut lift? As far as reds and the fees, I usually only charge for facility and anesthesia fees NOT a professional or my time component fee. Always best to preoperativel have everything informed and try on implant sizers.....

Sisters - Not twins!

When you started, you had two different breasts.  Your right breast is pointing out and is lower that your left.  I think you have an excellent result.  Discuss your dissatisfaction with your plastic surgeon. 

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.