Tubular breasts? Should I get tear drop or regular round implants? (Photo)

Do my breast look tublaur if so should I get tear drop or will regular round work ok? I also want to go pretty large is it possible?

Doctor Answers 10

Tubular breasts? Should I get tear drop or regular round implants?

Size and shape of breasts can often play a critical role in a woman’s self-esteem. Fuller and bigger breasts are often associated with reproducibility therefore it is a desired condition. There are different kinds of breast augmentation operation types. Breast augmentation can be performed either with breast implants or autologous fat transfer. There are also different types of breast implants like teardrop or round implants. These implants also can be placed under or above the muscle. As you can imagine there are several different options for breast augmentation. The best way to understand which one is more suitable for you is to get a physical examination by a plastic surgeon.

#tubularbreasts #teardropimplants #roundimplants

From your photos, I do not believe you have tubular breasts. The implant that you choose with your board certified PS is dependent on what look you want for desired result.

I will say that a properly fitted tear drop implant will not allow you as much upper pole fullness and increase in cup size as you desire based on your comments. However, please discuss this with your PS as your soft tissue thickness is part of your assessment for implants and you do appear to be fairly thin and appear to have minimal upper pole breast tissue.

Jack Peterson, MD
Topeka Plastic Surgeon
4.4 out of 5 stars 34 reviews

Breast implant question

Dear Aprilash
Thank you for your question, while you do not seem to have the classic tubular breast deformity, you have some asymmetry.  Most likely a standard breast implant will work for you , I do not think you need a tear drop implant.  While tear drop implants are shaped, they can cause issues if done improperly.
In my patients I prefer silicone round implants because they have a soft feel and are most useful in nearly all situations.  Hope this helps and good luck!

Dr Narasimhan

Kailash Narasimhan, MD
Sherman Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

Implants for tubular breasts

It is difficult to tell from your photos if you have tubular breasts. It appears that you may have some asymmetry. The best way to determine the shape of implant is an exam and breast measurement by the plastic surgeon. Patients who do not want a lot of fullness at the top of their breasts choose teardrop implants so that it mimics the shape of the natural breast. If you are wanting overall fullness and more cleavage, a round implant would fit your needs. It is best to discuss all of this with your surgeon. In my practice, my patients try on different sizes of implants and are shown the different shapes of implants as well as looking at many before and after photos.

Tubular breasts? Should I get tear drop or regular round implants?

The photo isn't the best but it does not look like you have a tuberous deformity, just small breasts. Both the size and shape of the implant that will be best for you depend first on your goal look and then also on your chest anatomy. Those decisions cannot be made without an exam and consultation. 

Ronald V. DeMars, MD
Portland Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 24 reviews

Round implants are preferred implants

You do not have tubular breasts. Round implants give best results.  However size should be fitted to patient's frame for best outcome.  Going large for largeness sake can be problematic in long terms.  That goal needs to be realistic. Let a good surgeon guide you regarding size. 

Vasdev Rai, MD
Dallas Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 21 reviews

Round implants are usually the best option.

I'm not sure you have tuberous (sometimes called tubular) breasts. But your photo is a little dark and hard to view. Regardless, round implants are preferred. Shaped implants tend to emphasize lower pole fullness rather than upper pole fullness (women want more upper pole fullness). Shaped implants tend to be textured. Smooth is better. They are also more expensive. You would be well served with smooth round implants. I have attached a link to my website in case you want to read more.

Eric Swanson, MD
Kansas City Plastic Surgeon
4.7 out of 5 stars 48 reviews

Which Implants are best for tubular breasts?

There are some tubular breast characteristics in your breasts (small amount of breast tissue, puffy areola), however, without a breast exam, that includes measurements, I would not go straight to that diagnosis or labeling.
It is most likely that round implants will be best choice in the end, however, based on your in-office consultation this may change. I would want to see your desired looks (and also photos of what you do NOT like). These visuals are very helpful in understanding your goals, explaining what you can expect with different implants (sizes and shapes) and ascertaining the precise implant for you. We have numerous implant sizes (volume, base diameters and projection values) to choose from. Our surgery center keeps many of these implants on consignment. In addition, ordering specific ranges of implants to have on hand specifically for you is part of giving you the best aesthetic surgical experience possible.

Dr. Steve Byrd

Steve Byrd, MD
Dallas Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 20 reviews

Tubular breast and implants

Thank you for your question. It is hard to tell for sure if you have a tubular breast based upon photos. It would also depend on how much the skin below your areola stretches out. That being said, a shaped implant can be a great choice for a tubular breast but round implants also work well. The key is the surgical release of any tissue constriction in the lower half of the breast. This will give you a more rounded natural shape. I would advise you to see a board certified plastic surgeon for consultation. Best of luck.

Evan W Beale, MD
Dallas Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 6 reviews

Tubular breasts? Should I get tear drop or regular round implants?

Thank you for the question and photo. It is difficult to tell if you have tuberous breasts from the photo posted..  
Ultimately, careful communication of your goals (in my practice I prefer the use of goal pictures, direct examination/communication in front of a full-length mirror, in bra sizers, and computer imaging) as well as careful measurements (dimensional planning) will be critical.
Generally speaking, the best online advice I can give to ladies who are considering breast augmentation surgery ( regarding breast implant size/profile selection) is:
1. Concentrate on choosing your plastic surgeon carefully. Concentrate on appropriate training, certification, and the ability of the plastic surgeon to achieve the results you are looking for. Ask to see lots of examples of his/her work.
2. Have a full discussion and communication regarding your desired goals with your plastic surgeon. This communication will be critical in determining breast implant size/type/profile will most likely help achieve your goals.
In my practice, the use of photographs of “goal” pictures (and breasts that are too big or too small) is very helpful. For example, I have found that the use of know words such as “natural” or "as large as possible” etc means different things to different people and therefore prove unhelpful.
Also, as you know, cup size varies depending on him who makes the bra; therefore, discussing desired cup size may also be inaccurate. Again, the use of computer imaging has been very helpful during the communication process, in our practice.
3. Once you feel you have communicated your goals clearly, allow your plastic surgeon to use his/her years of experience/judgment to choose the breast implant size/profile that will best meet your goals. Again, in my practice, this decision is usually made during surgery, after the use of temporary intraoperative sizers.
I hope this (and the attached link/video, dedicated to breast augmentation surgery concerns) helps. Best wishes for an outcome that you will be very pleased with.

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.