Going Larger - experts thoughts. (photos)

I want to go 150cc bigger and switch from HP to UHP. I know every surgery has its risk I have an apt. w/ my physician on Mon. to discuss, I did the awake aug in the past and preferred that. The size I am wanting my physician has a lot of experience with and I have prepped all my questions so I can ensure I get everything answered. Just curious with other physicians, do you get patients that want to come back for replacement for a different size and how do you feel about it?

Doctor Answers 4

Increasing implant size

Women commonly change their implant size following augmentation. It is the most common revision procedure performed nationally. In general patients need to increase implant size >100cc to notice the difference. For a revision procedure, awake breast augmentation is a reasonable idea. I would caution you that the majority of doctors that perform the procedure this way are not plastic surgeons. The busiest "awake breast aug" surgeon in Dallas is an OB/GYN. Be sure to do your homework there. It is important to know that increasing your implant size and switching to UHP implants might look good in the short term. However you will be doing irreversible damage to your breast tissue in the long term. There will be significant atrophy of your breast tissue (it will shrink) and your skin will be very stretched out from the pressure of the implants. Best of luck!

Increasing implant size

Thank you for your question.  Although you may certainly go larger to fulfill your immediate goals, keep in mind that overly large implants long term can thin out your breast tissue, distort anatomy, lead to deformity and increase the risk of capsular contracture.  Good luck.

Zachary Farris, MD, FACS
Dallas Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 16 reviews

Increasing Implant Size?

When increasing breast implant size, most women need at least 125-150cc to even really register a breast change.  Also, the larger your current implant is, the larger the increase you need to make just to see a difference.  For example - a patient that has 500cc HP is not going to see much of a difference at all going to 600cc.  They need to be at 700cc or more to even register a change.  Make sure you discuss this with your surgeon since your ideal picture looks significantly larger than your own current pictures.  I hope this helps.

Going Larger - experts thoughts.

Thank you for the question. The use of breast implants that are larger than your anatomic measurements can be potentially problematic. However, there are many hundreds of patients in our practice who have done very well with larger breast implants long term; the key, in my opinion, is appropriate matching of breast implant size to the specific patients anatomy…

Generally speaking, the best online advice I can give to ladies who are considering revisionary breast augmentation surgery is:

1. Concentrate on choosing your plastic surgeon carefully. Concentrate on appropriate training, certification, and the ability of the plastic surgeon to achieve the results you are looking for. Ask to see lots of examples of his/her work.

2. Have a full discussion and communication regarding your desired goals with your plastic surgeon. This communication will be critical in determining breast implant size/type/profile will most likely help achieve your goals. 
In my practice, the use of photographs of “goal” pictures (and breasts that are too big or too small) is very helpful. I have found that the use of words such as “natural” or "rounded look” or "DD cup" etc means different things to different people and therefore prove unhelpful.
Also, as you know, cup size varies depending on who makes the bra; therefore, discussing desired cup size may also be inaccurate. 

3. Once you feel you have communicated your goals clearly, allow your chosen plastic surgeon to work with you in determining the best plan to achieve your goals. I hope this, and the attached link (dedicated to "larger" breast augmentation surgery concerns), helps. Best wishes. 

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.