Incision separation after Tummy tuck?

I did my tummy tuck 6 weeks ago but since day one I felt a big piece of scab right in the middle of my tummy insicion and now after 6 weeks it looks like this ? I went to my surgeon and she said just give it some time I really don't like the way it looks and she told me to put some gauze which I did but after one day when I went to take a shower the smell was so awful . What should I do ? Should I just wait or go for a second opinion ? And after it heals do I needs scar revision ?

Doctor Answers 6

Delayed wound healing

You have some delayed wound healing in that area.  You may need a little debridement, but certainly should be followed by a surgeon while you are healing.  If the area forms a wide scar, you can have it revised. 

Napa Plastic Surgeon

#abdominoplasty #plasticsurgery #Tummytuck

Hello Haidi, Congratulations on your recent surgery and thank you for sharing your question about your post operative recovery and results after your surgery.  Final results can take up to 12 months for all the swelling to subside.  At our office here at CARE we actually see all of our surgery patients the very next day after surgery and then again at two weeks and beyond. We enjoy staying closely connected to our patients and enjoy giving the extra attention and service.  Your concerns are important to discuss directly with your board certified plastic surgeon.  He or she will appreciate the open communication and will want to help you.

If you seek out a second opinion look for the following:  *Board Certified by the American Board of Plastic Surgery -- The gold star symbol  *A member of the ASPS (American Society of Plastic Surgeons) -- The circle symbol   *A member of the ASAPS (American Society of Aesthetic Plastic Surgeons) -- the Queen Nefertitti symbol.   Feel free to contact our office, it would be our pleasure to answer your questions in person.  My very best to you, Brian S. Coan, MD, FACS  Care Plastic Surgery

Brian Coan, MD, FACS
Raleigh-Durham Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 49 reviews

Wound should heal okay

Thanks for your question and the photo. Congratulations on your surgery. I'm sorry that you have the area of separation. The middle area has the least amount of perfusion and can not infrequently be associated with delayed healing. Your surgeon likely will trim away part of the scab to expedite the healing. Although it looks worrisome, my guess is that it will heal up well and not require any intervention. Best of Luck!

M. Scott Haydon, MD
Austin Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 83 reviews

Healing after TT

You need to see your plastic surgeon regularly while you are healing. She will need to remove some of the dead tissue so your wound care can be more effective. Best wishes. 

Delayed wound healing after tummy tuck

You should definitely see your plastic surgeon.  Wound separations are not uncommon and are best treated by debridement by the plastic surgeon.  Usually these heal quite well if they are promptly treated and cleaned.  Occasionally patients need a small revision 6 months later.

Brent Moelleken, MD
Beverly Hills Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 134 reviews

Wound separation

Thank you for your question and photo. It is difficult to tell from the photo but I am guessing this wound separation is right in the middle of your incision. This is a common place for a wound separation to occur for reasons of blood supply. These wounds typically heal well with a little tender loving care. It is important to be in close contact with your surgeon. Small areas may be needed to be debrided so that the wound can heal without infection. These areas usually heal up with in a few weeks. Down the road, if the scar is not great, it can be revised in the office. Most important thing is to keep in touch with your surgeon. She should see you at least once a week until you are well on the way to healing properly.

Best Wishes,

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.