As a child I was put to sleep with a mask for my broken nose via emergency surgery. Is this the same anesthetic used during TT?

Doctor Answers 3

Anesthesia for a tummy tuck

If you are asking if they will use a mask to put you to sleep, then the answer is most likely yes if you are going to have general anesthesia. Not all surgeons give their patients general anesthesia (although the majority do) for abdominoplasties. Sometimes blocks with sedation are used. General anesthesia has made significant improvements so the actual drugs that were used then may not be used as much anymore. It just depends how long ago you were a child. :)


Birmingham Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

As a child I was put to sleep with a mask for my broken nose via emergency surgery. Is this the same anesthetic used during TT?

Thank you for your question.  If you were taken to the operating room for repair of your broken nose it is very likely the same family of inhaled anesthetics would be used for your tummy tuck.  Hope this helps. 

Nelson Castillo, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 43 reviews

Anesthesia

Typically when children get anesthesia "laughing" gas is given to relax the child allowing the anesthesiologist to start an IV without traumatizing the child.   Most adults can tolerate the placement of an IV which is then used to give similar medications to relax you.   If you are having surgery completed under sedation you may have some oxygen placed under your nose but will likely not need a mask before you drift off to sleep.  If you are having general anesthesia you will have a mask placed over your nose and mouth to increase the oxygen in your lungs prior to the start of the anesthesia.  Hope that answers your questions.

Jacob Bloom, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.