Scabbing and tuberous breast correction with subglandular breast implants?

Will this procedure leave one eith more skin scabbing "around"the areolar region 1/2 inch

Doctor Answers 2

Scabbing and tuberous breast correction with subglandular breast implants?

Hello!  Thank you for your question!  I am unsure of your question.   The standard procedure for tuberous breast deformity, if that is truly your diagnosis, would be placement of an implant (or tissue expander, depending on the lower pole of your breast) as well as a circumareolar breast lift. These modalities would correct the issues with tuberous breast: constricted breast at the inferior pole, via breast prosthetic; scoring of the tissue to release the bands; lowering the inframammary fold; correcting the herniation of breast tissue into the areolae; and decreasing the overall size of the areolae. These are the hallmarks of tuberous breasts.  So, you would have incisions around your nipple, which I would hope heal well for you. 

Hope that this helps! Best wishes for a wonderful result!

Scottsdale Plastic Surgeon
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Any incision around the areola, including ones for correction of tuberous breast can leave scabbing

With such limited information and no images it is impossible to provide any detailed information here about your question.  I can tell you that any incision around the areola can leave scabs, depending upon how long it has been since surgery, and in the case of correction of tuberous breasts, often a complete circumferential incision has been made.  In these cases the blood supply to the areola may be compromised, and this can result in necrosis, or death, of the skin, and that can appear as "scabbing" too.  This is only a general statement, and it is not meant to cause you to panic or be upset, rather it is intended to motivate you to call your own surgeon who knows exactly what was done in surgery and what to look for.  He or she will be best to evaluate your specific situation and advise you accordingly.  Best of luck.

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