Pain on areola/scar area 8 years after Gynecomastia Surgery

I had Gynecomastia surgery 8 years ago. On right side, I still get a minor pricking or 'wound' like pain in the aerola area where the cut was made. It's a minor pain that I've neglected, since was quite fine with the results. I have done nothing in 8 years. Only recently I met my doc and currently taking Neurobion tab (for 30 days).Skeptic this would help! Since the pain is nearby the surgery scar, wondering if massaging helps? Please suggest on massage methods or any other ways for pain?

Doctor Answers 1

Pain and Scarring Years after Surgery

Following surgery, your incisions will go through a maturation process. For the first few months they will be red and possibly raised and/or firm. As the scar matures, after 6-12 months, it becomes soft, pale, flat, and much less noticeable. You may experience numbness, tingling, burning, “crawling”, or other peculiar sensations around the surgical area. This is a result of the healing of tiny fibers which are trapped in the incision site. These symptoms will disappear. Some people are prone to keloids, which is an abnormal scar that becomes prominent. If you or a blood relative has a tendency to keloid formation, please inform the doctor.

As with all operations, pain and discomfort varies greatly from patient to patient. Generally, one should expect that pain medication will be required for the first several days. Continuing discomfort can last varying amounts of time.

Considering the length of time since your procedure it is likely that your healing as completed and it may be best to visit your previous surgeon for an examination to make sure that nothing needs revision. There is also the option to visit a new local certified plastic surgeon for a consultation as to any revisions that are available to help resolve your concerns with the final results you have received to date.


Orange County Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 96 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.