What's the best way to correct tubular breasts? (photos)

I'm 25 years old, 5'10,200lbs and have a large frame. At puberty my breast just seemed to stop growing. I have 2 children. During pregnancy, my breasts did not change much. Had breast milk supply issues. I've come to the conclusion that I have tuberous breasts. I'm extremely self concious and want them fixed. I plan  to try to have them fixed once I'm done nursing. I would like large implants, is this possible? How many surgeries will I need?

Doctor Answers 12

Correcting tubular breasts

     From the photos, you appear to have tubular breasts.  Usually, the breast appearance can be corrected in one surgery.   This surgery will address the shape of the breast tissue and allow for breast implants to be placed to increase the size of your breasts.  See a board certified plastic surgeon and good luck.


Toledo Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 38 reviews

Tubular breasts

Dear concious,
  Thanks for submitting your pictures. From observing your pictures, you have the classical presentation of tubular breasts - small ptotic breasts with large herniating areolas. 
  The best way to correct your condition is to perform breasts augmentation with mini lift ( donut ). These procedures will result in larger perky breasts with smaller and more natural looking areolas.
 Breasts augmentation alone, will result in bad outcome: worse ptosis, larger and still herniating areolas. Trying to raise the nipples by lowering significantly the fold , can result in double bubble deformity.
 As far as size,  what do you mean by :large breasts" ? full C, D or DD ?
  You did not provide your chest circumference measurement in inches , which is critical for the correct implants size selection for you. Lets assume that you are presently 36 small A cup. To become 36 D cup, you will need implants with volume of 625 cc. For 38 D - 700 cc.
 Remember , that not all results are the same, because experience , skills and aesthetic eye are critical for good outcome. So, do your due diligence and choose wisely. 
  Always, consult with experienced board certified plastic surgeons who operate in accredited surgery center for your safety. Most importantly, check the before and after pictures in the photo gallery, to make sure that they are numerous, consistent and attractive.
                        Best of luck,
                                                 Dr Widder

Shlomo Widder, MD
McLean Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 124 reviews

Breast augmentation

 It does appear that you have a mild case of  tuberous breast but without a significant amount of ptosis. I would suggest that a breast augmentation alone will be very effective for you. I do not think that you will need an external lift but there are some internal techniques that the surgeon will use to help improve the shape of your breast during the breast augmentation. I would suggest  seeing a board-certified plastic surgeon in your area who can explain these techniques to you.Good luck! 

Mark T. Boschert, MD
Saint Louis Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 30 reviews

Breast augmentation can help.

Your pictures show qualities consistent with tuberous breasts, and breast augmentation could give you the rounder, fuller breast shape you'd like to see. Typically, breast augmentation performed in tubular breasts requires some extra steps (similar to a breast lift) to release the constricted tissue as part of the procedure. Otherwise, the implants won't settle correctly and the results won't look as natural as they could. The best thing to do at this point is to book a consultation with a board-certified plastic surgeon who specializes in breast augmentation and is familiar with the challenges of breast enhancement in tuberous breasts. From there, they can offer a personalized recommendation that meets your goals.

Ricardo A. Meade, MD
Dallas Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 117 reviews

Tuburous breasts

You have components of tuberous breasts and  could benefit from an implant and a small circumareola lift. 

Steven Wallach, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
4.1 out of 5 stars 27 reviews

Tuberous breast

It is difficult to give you a precise answer with examining you in person, but in general the recommendations are a dual plane augmentation with scoring of the lower pole parenchyma with a possible periareolar mastpexy.  Some surgeons also recommend form stable implants rather than round implants.  Hopefully you will only need one surgery.

Mark A. Schusterman, MD
Houston Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 77 reviews

Tuberous breast augmentation

Generally a periareolar approach, subglandular pocket placement, and radial parenchymal scoring will give you a rounder look with increased nipple to IMF distance.

John L. Burns Jr., MD
Dallas Plastic Surgeon
4.7 out of 5 stars 42 reviews

Dr Kayser

Thank you for your question. You have a mild form of what is referred to as a tuberous breasts. This is narrowing of the lower portion of the breast with a slight degree of ptosis. The areolar diameter is also larger than a lot of women prefer to have. These should be correctable with augmentation and even more so with the circum areolar lift which would also allow the implant to be placed as well. This would elevate the nipple position and also reduce the areolar diameter. Your biggest risk is acquiring a deformity, such as a double bubble, should an implant he used that would be larger than the natural proportions of your breasts. In any case, I would expect that you would have a good long-term result. I would recommend a consultation with a board-certified plastic surgeon who is experienced in these matters. I hope this helps and have a wonderful day. Dr. Kayser - Detroit

Melek Kayser, MD
Detroit Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 37 reviews

What's the best way to correct tubular breasts?

Multiple surgeries are usually needed. Best to seek in person opinions to see the stages of surgical intervention. 

Darryl J. Blinski, MD
Miami Plastic Surgeon
4.6 out of 5 stars 173 reviews

What's the best way to correct tubular breasts?

Thank you for the question and pictures.
I think your breasts demonstrate some of the qualities seen with tuberous (constricted) breasts.
Some of the characteristics seen with tuberous breasts include a very narrow base, short distance from areola to inframammary fold, tight (constricted) lower pole of the breasts, relatively wide space between the breasts, "puffy" and areola and some degree of ptosis (drooping).
Generally, correction of tuberous breast anomalies involves breast augmentation with areola reduction / mastopexy procedure. The distance from the inframammary fold is increased (to create a more rounded out appearance). Proper implant positioning improves the distance (cleavage) between the breasts. The areola reduction helps to treat the pointed and "puffy" appearance of the areola. Both your breast and areola symmetry can be improved upon.
Patients should be aware that the final result will take months to see and that they will need to be patient and that revisionary surgery is more likely than in patients who do not present with tuberous (constricted) breasts.
In your case, if the appearance/shape/size of the breasts are a concern, you may be an excellent candidate for corrective surgery. This would best be done when you are ( and you may already be there) close to your long-term stable weight. Surgery will likely involve breast augmentation and some degree of breast lifting (circumareolar).
When you are ready, please make sure you consult with well experienced board-certified plastic surgeons who have significant demonstrable experience with this type of surgery. Ask to see lots of examples of their work and communicate your goals carefully as well.
I hope this, and the attached link (dedicated to tuberous/constricted breast surgery concerns) helps. Best wishes.

Tom J. Pousti, MD, FACS
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 1,484 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.