Chin Implant and Nose Job? (photo)

I have a receding chin and a mild overbite (straight teeth otherwise, never had braces). Its more noticeable when my teeth are clamped shut so I've made a habit of leaving my teeth not touching but mouth closed (if that makes sense). I'm not sure if a chin implant is what I need, or if I need jaw surgery, or just braces. A pic of my profile each way is attached. My other issue is my nose. Its a little wide and when I smile it flares out. Can a nose job fix this? I'm 20 if that matters.

Doctor Answers 17

Chin implant and nose job?

An orthodontic assessment would be advised to address any issue with your bite. If your bite is corrected with orthodontics, this will not change the appearance of your chin. In general, a chin implant in combination with rhinoplasty yields a fantastic result. A rhinoplasty can help address your concerns. I would recommend an in-person consult with a board certified rhinoplasty specialist. He or she will be able to examine you and provide you with advice. Computer imaging software may be used, which can give you an idea of how the final result of surgery may appear. I hope this helps, and I wish you the best of luck.

Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 44 reviews

Combined Chin Implant and Nose Job

It is relatively common for patients to have both a chin implant and nose job performed in single procedure. In fact, the combination can yield incredible results for your side profile, giving you added projection and a more defined appearance. And, having both procedures in a single sitting provides the advantage of a single prep, surgery, and recovery period. This is something to discuss with your plastic surgeon, as he or she knows your condition best and can best advise you accordingly

Rhinoplasty and chin implant/genioplasty

I like working with a face like your, attractive to start by just needs a change here and there to make it unforgettable.  With that said, I agree with the rhinoplasty.  I also agree that your chin is slightly "weak."  I think you need a chin implant (small, abt 3mm) or a sliding genioplasty.  I would have to see you in person to know which is best for you.  I think you will very happy. Don't know where you live, but would love to see you in Austin.  Take care.

Adam Bryce Weinfeld, MD
Austin Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 50 reviews

Chin Implant and Nose Job

A chin implant certainly would be the most straight forward approach to make the appearance of your chin better but it would not address the underlying structural component involving your jaw. You could meet with an orthodontist to see if the teeth could be adjusted or whether you would be a candidate for jaw surgery. In many women who are younger like you I always discuss doing a genioplasty which is a procedure where you advance the chin portion of your jaw forward. This is a slightly larger operation then a chin implant but can provide nice long-term stability without the worries or problems that can arise with a implant long-term. This is an option that is often not talked about because many plastic surgeons are not comfortable with bony work in the face. In regards to your nose, a rhinoplasty could address many of your concerns and combining the two operations can yield fantastic results. Good Luck!

Chin implant and nose job?

Hello and thank you for your question.As long as your occlusion (bite) is verified to be normal, it appears as though you may benefit from a chin implant. As for your nose, your profile is quite good. You appear to have a boxy tip and perhaps a wide base of your nose. A rhinoplasty can be performed to fix these things. This is a procedure I perform in my office and general anesthesia is not necessary if a patient prefers not to have it! I recommend that you see a board certified plastic surgeon in consultation to get more specific answers to your questions which can best be addressed after a thorough history and examination is performed.
Best of luck to you

David Cangello, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

Chin Implant and Nose Job

Yes, you are correct!  You are a candidate for either or both.  A chin implant will balance your face.  The rhinoplasty is to reduce the size of the nose to fit better with the face.  

Francis R. Palmer, III, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.6 out of 5 stars 24 reviews

Nose job and chin implant combination

A rhinoplasty or nose job is performed on the nose  when it is out of balance with the remainder of the facial features. This may include narrowing the bridge, the tip or shaving down the hump if present.  The rhinoplasty procedure can be done through closed rhinoplasty techniques as an outpatient surgical procedure under general anesthesia.
 The chin implant procedure involves insertion of a Silastic implant through a sub mental approach in combination with the rhinoplasty under general anesthesia or as a stand-alone procedure under local anesthesia.

William Portuese, MD
Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.7 out of 5 stars 126 reviews

Chin Implant and Nose Job?

What matters is posted better more close up non under exposed photos.. I think a wedge resection for the nose and an extended chin implant would be a good option but really not sure. Best to seek IN PERSON opinions....

Teeth and nose

Since you are not smiling in your photos, I can't see your teeth.  You may need either braces or even jaw surgery ( less likely ).  Your nose can be narrowed and a small chin implant used if no braces are necessary.

Ronald J. Edelson, MD
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 24 reviews

Rhinoplasty and Chin Implaant

A chin implant would make a significant improvement in the proportions of your lower face. From the pictures submitted it looks like surgery limited to your tip (not a full rhinoplasty) will narrow and refine your nose. Consult with a specialist to achieve a natural result with minimum surgery.

Richard W. Fleming, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 38 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.