Tummy tuck 7 days post, any suggestions? (photos)

I was looking at my stomach and it has this lil pooch here. Should you have this after a tummy tuck? Will it flatten or something?

Doctor Answers 5

Tummy tuck

Thank you for your question and photograph.

It is hard to determine from this photograph but it could just be swelling. Swelling is completely normal after a tummy tuck but everybody heals at different rates. Swelling will start to resolve over 4-6 months after your tummy tuck procedure. It is important to follow your surgeon’s aftercare instructions and you should start to notice your results begin to refine and swelling should dissipate leaving you with your true result. If you have any concerns I would have your plastic surgeon examine you to determine whether any complications have occurred. Best of luck in your recovery!

James Fernau, MD, FACS
Board Certified ENT
Board Certified Plastic Surgery
Member of ASPS, ASAPS, ISAPS, The Rhinoplasty Society, AAFPRS, OTO/HNS, ASLMS, International Federation for Adipose Therapeutics & Science

Pittsburgh Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 64 reviews

Tummy Tuck Recovery

Thank you for your question.

It is a bit difficult to say exactly what's going on in your picture.  If you are concerned, I recommend contacting your plastic surgeon to discuss the issue.  They know you, and your surgery, best.


Dr. Dan Krochmal

MAE Plastic Surgery

Northbrook, IL

Daniel Krochmal, MD
Chicago General Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

One Week After Abdominoplasty

After an abdominoplasty, it can take 3-6 months for everything to settle down and stop changing.  You still have a lot of swelling, and the skin needs to tighten up and smooth out.  That is where the abdominal binder/ compression can be critical - helping to control swelling and retrain the existing skin.  Just be patient, follow your surgeon's instructions, and you will be happy in the long run.  I hope this helps.

7 Days Post-Op

Most patients will be placed in an abdominal binder, which they will wear the first week. There is usually a fair amount of swelling and the binder should be opened several times a day so that there are no pressure points. After the first 7 to 10 days the patient is placed in an elastic garment for compression over the next six weeks. You can return to full activity without restrictions at 6 weeks.

Swelling can persist for several months and will gradually improve and will look better at three months, six months, and even one year. Frequently the pubic area and the scrotal and penis area for men can become very swollen and discolored during the first two weeks due to gravity as this is the lowest area for swelling to accumulate.

Revision surgery is unusual but may be desired for several reasons. Most revisions should be done after 9-12 months.  One cause for revision surgery are “dog ears” at the ends of the incisions. These are small folds of excess skin that do not flatten over time.  They can be excised, suctioned or both. Excess fat or loose skin may require liposuction and skin excision to obtain the best result.

Since you are still very early in the healing process there should not be any reason to worry and this is most likely the normal swelling that can last for months. If you are worried at all about your healing it would be best to visit your surgeon to have the area evaluated and make sure that everything is healing well.

Jed H. Horowitz, MD, FACS
Orange County Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 94 reviews

Tummy Tuck/Abdominoplasty/Liposuction/Vaser High Definition Procedures/Tummy Tuck Revision

I appreciate your question.

Since there has been a change in your post op course, please contact your surgeon so he/she can examine you and recommend the most appropriate treatment plan at this time.

The best way to assess and give true advice would be an in-person exam.

Please see a board-certified plastic surgeon that specializes in aesthetic and restorative plastic surgery.

Best of luck!

Dr. Schwartz

Board Certified Plastic Surgeon



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