What causes a double bubble to form after Breast Augmentation?

I recently had two consultations and feel great about the implants, sizes, procedure and expected recovery that was discussed. I just forgot to ask how a "double bubble" forms after getting a BA. I've seen a few pictures on here and haven't really understood what is actually happening with the implant. Thanks!

Doctor Answers 7

What causes a double-bubble...........

a double-bubble is a phenomenon that occurs after breast augmentation but is preventable. Using appropriately sized implants dual-plane two technique and careful placement of the implant will prevent double-bubble.

Perth Plastic Surgeon
3.9 out of 5 stars 19 reviews

Double bubble and breast augmentation

Obviously you have done a great deal of research and planning and that is always welcome when I consult with a potential patient.
Double bubble may occur as a result of the implant descending below the natural inframammary crease which gives the appearance of "two breasts" or double bubble. Several factors can contribute such as chest wall shape and breast morphology, implant size, pocket dissection and  pectoralis muscle division.
Implant size, placement and soft tissue cover are big contributors and should be discussed.  Wishing you the best.

Paul Watterson, MD
Charlotte Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 38 reviews

What causes a double bubble to form

A double bubble is the result of the implant form appearing below the form of the natural breast tissue. Functionally this occurs when the implant is placed too far below the breast fold. The implant must be centered under the nipple. As the implant gets larger, that requires the new fold to be lower. So if your surgeon does not take this into consideration and is trying to meet your size goals that are too big for your anatomy, a double bubble can occur. Good luck.

Robert Graper, MD
Charlotte Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 26 reviews

Double bubble

A double bubble can develop with undermining of the fold, or when the implant pushes down and drops below the fold, or when the implant is too large for the breast, and it can not stretch out over the implant.

Steven Wallach, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
4.1 out of 5 stars 24 reviews

Double bubble phenomena after breast augmentation.

If the breast implant is placed below the infra mammary fold the tightness of that anatomic structure can create a crease in the breast implant referred to as a double bubble.

Vincent N. Zubowicz, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 32 reviews

Double bubble

There is no "official" definition. The term usually refers to the appearance of a constricting band across the implant giving the appearance of two curves rather than one.

Usually this is caused when there is an impression of the breast fold on the implant either because the implant was placed lower than the fold, or when the implant descends lower than the fold during the post op period.

The other occasional cause is an impression from the lower edge of the pectoralis muscle  on the implant.  

Hope that helps.  All the best. 

Double bubble - persistence of the old inframammary fold

With breast augmentation, a double bubble deformity is at risk of developing when the natural existing inframammary fold is lowered to accommodate an implant of larger dimension.  When the old fold is detached, it permits the implant to position itself lower on the chest.  However, the old fold often persists as a firm horizontal band indenting the bottom pole of the implant causing the double bubble.  Instances where the fold might be lowered include constricted base of a tuberous breast, breast asymmetry with a unilaterally high fold, and instances where the base of breast is intentionally enlarged to a larger footprint using a wide implant are at risk of double bubble. 

Most breast augmentations do not require lowering of the fold and do not suffer this complication.  When an inframammary fold is intentionally lowered the old fold may persist leading to double bubble.

Chen Lee, MD
Montreal Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 16 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.