Will brief, accidental exposure to sun affect the end result for my gynecomastia incision scar?

Hi all, I'm in my third week of recovery from gynecomastia surgery which went really well. I was taking a nap earlier inside and I woke up, and took the blanket off of my chest. Within a minute, I looked at my chest and noticed the sun was peering through the window exactly on my chest so I quickly got up and out of he sun. My question is though it was very brief and through a window, will this have an effect on my scar?? I'm really, really hoping not as this has been one heck of a journey!

Doctor Answers 8

Will brief, accidental exposure to sun affect the end result for my gynecomastia incision scar?

Thank you for your question.  Because of being inside, and your surgical site was covered by a blanket, it is unlikely that your results will be affected in any way from the accidental sun exposure.  Hang in there, your results will continue to mature and improve.   


Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 43 reviews

Your Healing Incisions and Exposure to Sun Light

It's likely that the sun exposure did not affect the healing or end-result of your surgery. If anything, the surgical site may be somewhat sensitive to the #sun light and may be irritated as a result. Following #Gynecomastia #surgery, your #incisions will go through a maturation #process. For the first few months they will be red and possibly raised and/or firm. As the scar matures, after 6-12 months, it becomes soft, pale, flat, and much less noticeable. You may experience numbness, tingling, burning, “crawling”, or other peculiar sensations around the surgical area. This is a result of the #healing of tiny fibers which are trapped in the incision site. These symptoms will disappear. Some people are prone to keloids, which is an abnormal scar that becomes prominent. If you or a blood relative has a tendency to keloid formation, please inform the doctor.

Jed H. Horowitz, MD, FACS
Orange County Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 96 reviews

Sun and scar

The amount of sun exposure you are describing is essentially nil, so it will not affect the quality of your scar.  Don't worry.

Jeffrey D. Wagner, MD
Indianapolis Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 16 reviews

Sun after Gynecomastia Removal

You should talk to your plastic surgeon about your concerns. I advise all my patients that it is very important to protect your incisions from the sun. Keep your chest completely covered until your incisions have closed (approx. 2 weeks). After that time, you must wear a high grade sunscreen on your incisions for a minimum of 12 weeks to ensure optimal healing of the scars.

#gynecomastiaremoval
#malebreastreduction
#gynecomastiaremovalpostop

Not to worry

The angle of the suns rays this close to winter solstice is not enough to cause significant ultraviolet damage.  You are quite safe.

Richard Zienowicz, MD
Providence Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 45 reviews

Sun Exposure to Incisions

Hi mitchman4949,
Thanks for the post. You shouldn't need to worry about long term effects to your incision because there was no direct sun exposure for an extended period of time. Best of luck with the rest of your recovery.

Sincerely,
Dr. Dadvand

Babak Dadvand, MD
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 39 reviews

Will Sun Exposure Affect Incision?

For such brief exposure it is unlikely to have caused any damage. It is good that you are being careful, stay on track! Good luck.

Miguel Delgado, MD
San Francisco Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 68 reviews

Sun exposure on a scar

Thank you for actually following directions! We love it when patients do that. 

You are fine. You shouldn't have gotten much in the way of exposure under a blanket and through a window. Keep up with your scar care.

Tracy E. McCall, MD
Milwaukee Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 1 review

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.