I was told after by BA I should try not to lift my heart rate for at least 2 weeks after surgery.

How do I monitor this? I'm an athletic person & hope to walk, etc as I was told I could. What heart rate # wise am I allowed to lift my heart rate to? A percentage higher than my current resting or another way? I just want a way to be able to monitor myself to ensure healing and health

Doctor Answers 18

Avoid Strenuous Activity

For women who lead active lifestyles, it can be very difficult to willingly postpone vigorous exercise — but it's critical to your recovery. You should follow your plastic surgeon's specific post-operative instructions regarding physical activity, and if there isn't a clear answer on whether it's OK to resume a specific activity, it's best to reach out to your surgeon rather than just assuming you'll be fine. I advise my patients to wait 4 weeks before participating in vigorous exercise such as aerobics, jogging, or swimming, except for patients with textured implants (they need to wait 6 weeks). Heavy lifting and workouts that strain the upper body should also be avoided. I do encourage walking early in the recovery to ensure good blood circulation, because it greatly lowers the risk of clotting or other complications.   

I was told after by BA I should try not to lift my heart rate for at least 2 weeks after surgery.

Thank you for your question and Breast augmentation” operation is performed under general anesthesia and it takes to perform the procedure nearly 1 to 1.5 hours when it is performed by a team of plastic surgeons. It is really important to decrease the operation duration to give less anesthesia to the patient yielding a better postoperative period to the patient. You will be advised not to eat 6 hours before the surgery and that is all! You will get a physical examination by your surgeon and anesthetist. After the examination; we will prepare you for the surgery. You will receive a sedation in order to reduce the preoperative anxiety and fell yourself more comfortable.

Bulent Cihantimur, MD
Turkey Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 80 reviews

Exercise after Breast Augmentation

Thank you for your question.  You will find that there is no single universal answer regarding any aspect of post operative recovery, exercise and strenuous activity included.  Some surgeons recommend avoidance of these activities for 2 weeks and others for longer periods of time, and this is all based upon their specific experience, expertise and training.  For my patients, I ask that they avoid all exercise, heavy lifting and other strenuous activity for at least 4 weeks following a breast augmentation.  The concern is that these activities can increase your risks for bleeding and other post operative complications, which in my opinion are not worth risking just to get back to the gym a few days sooner.  


I would recommend discuss your surgeons specific post operative restrictions with your operating surgeon so they can best define what they mean by elevating your heart rate.  I hope this helps and I wish you the best on your recovery!

Breast Augmentation/Breast Implants/Anatomic Gummy Bear Implants/ Silicone Implants/Breast Implant Revision

I appreciate your question.

For my patients, I recommend no heavy lifting or strenuous activity for 6-8 weeks following surgery. Please discuss with your surgeon.

The best way to assess and give true advice would be an in-person exam.

Please see a board-certified plastic surgeon that specializes in aesthetic and restorative breast surgery.

Best of luck!

Dr. Schwartz

Board Certified Plastic Surgeon

#RealSelf100Surgeon

#RealSelfCORESurgeon

Post Breast Augmentation Activity

Thank you for your question!  I always recommend limiting any strenuous activity or heavy lifting for at least 4-6 weeks post op to allow yourself to heal and decrease any risk of bleeding and any other complications.  I would discuss how much walking and how fast with your board certified plastic surgeon to clarify what they are comfortable with!  I know it is difficult for an athletic person like yourself to limit activity for this amount of time! Thanks and good luck with everything!


Dr. Tag

Exercise-related hematomas

Yes - the reason for this is to prevent an effort-related (or exercise-related) hematoma - or bleeding inside the surgical site.  Just be a "couch potato" for 2 weeks and do not go to the gym or do exercises at home until your surgeon gives you clearance for it.  You do not need to wear a heart rate monitor.

Heart Rate

Yes, you should limit your exhertional activity for at least 2-week after surgery.  This includes limitation on any heavy lifting.  

I recommend an in-office examination as well as a detailed discussion with a surgeon who you are comfortable with and who is a Double-Board Certified Plastic Surgeon certified by the American Board of Plastic Surgery.

Best wishes!

Dr. Desai

Exercise after Breast Augmentation

The reason for this is to prevent possible hematoma from bleeding postop. For this reason, I advise my patients to refrain from cardio workouts and heavy lifting for 4 weeks. If you are an athlete, walking at modest pace should not be a be a problem , but check with your surgeon first.

Robert M. Tornambe, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 24 reviews

Heart rate

Thanks for the question. Heavy exercise is discouraged for 4-6 weeks, light exercise at 2 weeks. Your heart rate minimums are not a metric used for assessment after surgery. 

DrBurnett#realself100

Heart Rate After Surgery

Definitely take your surgeon's advice. Avoid any exercising or brisk walking for long periods of time, you can still walk around the house but no vigorous activity. This is to avoid getting a blood collection around your implants which could cause complications. Usually, two weeks after surgery patients are out of the woods for getting a blood collection, or hematoma, around the implant. I advise my patients to actually wait 3 weeks before returning to their normal exercise routine. 

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.