Is it common for the cliterus to be in the wrong place after surgery and will this heal back to normal?

I had labiaplasty 10 days ago and everything is healing well. I can notice my left side of my Labia now smaller and neat although my only worry is that my cliterous seems to be very exposed and situated on the right side of my new labia, not in the middle with a cliteral hood. I had a large labia and I've read that the cliteral hood can be decreased in operation due to this even without cliterol hood reduction. So, will this all heel and go back into place? Sorry no photos were uploaded.

Doctor Answers 9

Things will change over time and healing

But it's hard to know exactly what will result. All I can say is this: when I am done with a labiaplasty, everything looks symmetrical and normal and in the right place. Not uneven, not one side crooked or the clitoris hanging to one side or the other. This is a delicate operation but lots of rookies are out there trying to hop on a trend. Keep close follow up with your doctor and ask them the hard questions. If you don't like the answers then find an expert who can help you.Be patient, though, as things will certainly change as swelling goes down. It's doubtful that you'd need a revision, but if you do, wait 6 months for re-evaluation. 

Malpositioned Clitoris After Labiaplasty

Hi Sarah... 10 days is still very early after your procedure.  It sounds like you are seeing some nice improvement already.  Be patient and allow the swelling to settle and the healing to progress.  With time, more changes will come.  It is too soon to judge the final result.  Good luck!
Dr. Parham Ganchi - Wayne, NJ Plastic Surgeon

Parham Ganchi, PhD, MD
Wayne Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 128 reviews

Clitoris not in its original position.

Thank you for sharing with us. I'm happy to hear that you are recovering well and satisfied with your results thus far. You are still in the acute phase of recovery and therefore swelling may still play a factor. This swelling can sometimes deviate normal anatomic positioning of tissue and give the appearance of a  weirdly located clitoris.

Hope that helps.

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10 days post-labiaplasty & clitoris looks weird...

It's not at all rare to initially heal asymmetrically, where the clitoris seems "displaced." It will take a full 1-2 months before you can get an idea of post-surgical results. I know it's difficult, but appearance changes virtually day-by-day. If, at 1 month, appearance is still "weird," send us a couple pics to go on... The video & link below may help you.

Best wishes,

Michael P Goodman, MD
Davis, CA, USA

Is it common for the clitoris to be in the wrong place after surgery and will this heal back to normal?

Thank you for your question.  Due to the thin nature of the tissues of the labia minora significant post surgical swelling is common and can lead to asymmetry and distortion of your final results.  WIthout a full series of photographs to assess your results it is difficult to offer definite recommendations, but allow your swelling to resolve before assessing your results.  In a traditional labiaplasty and/or clitoral hood reduction, the clitoris is not affected and remains in its original place.  This is why it is likely asyymetrical swelling that may be causing an apparent deviation.  Hope this helps.

Nelson Castillo, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 38 reviews

Was my clitoris repositioned at the time of labiaplasty

Hello Sarah,

Thank you for your question, but without a photo I can't answer with specifics. In general, however, there is a lot of swelling after Labiaplasty that will distort the appearance to such a degree that things look abnormal. You can therefore be reassured that as the swelling goes down the appearance will improve. Also, it is not possible for the clitoris to be repositioned at the time of just a labia reduction.

I do recommend that you see your surgeon this week for examination and reassurance.

Best of luck,

Oscar A. Aguirre, MD
Denver Urogynecologist
5.0 out of 5 stars 21 reviews

Clitoris in the wrong place

Labiaplasty procedure is to not move the clitoris.  They simply address the surrounding labial and clitoral hood tissue.   It is difficult to comment without a photograph of what you are describing.  Because your procedure was only 10 days ago, it is too early to predict what your final outcome will be. My suggestion is to convey her concerns to your surgeon. Be patient and see what your final outcome is after six months.  

Erik Miles, MD, FACS
Charlotte Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 24 reviews

Clitoris in wrong place?

Hi and thank for submitting your question. Ideally it would be great to see a pic, especially a before and after and even better to do an in-person exam. However, just being 10 days post labiaplasty, it would be way too pre-mature to assume it was done wrong or healing wrong or that the surgeons technique was not ideal. 

I would wait just a till after the full 6-8 weeks post op time frame and then decide if it looks ok to you. Then talk to your surgeon.

Kurian Thott, MD
Fredericksburg OB/GYN

Clitoris in wrong place?

Dear Sara 6:

Thanks for sharing but it is difficult for any member of this board to help without and exam or at least a photo. However based upon my experience of more than 1500 labia reduction surgeries the reason for exposure of the clitoris can be a simple as: 1) the labia minora are reduced and now the clitoris can be seen ( i.e. you just never noticed before with the excess skin in the way 2) swelling is pushing the cltioris out from the body and to the right due to excess edema on the left  or 3) your surgeons technique was not the best.  Most likely it is due to a combination of the first two reasons.  Try to sit back and relax and allow the swelling to go down and reevaluate at about 6 weeks with your surgeon.  

John R Miklos MD
Cosmetic Vaginal Surgeon & Urogynecology
Atlanta ~ Beverly Hills ~ Dubai

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.