What type of chin surgery is needed? (photos)

Hi, I want to get a nose job and a chin reduction, as u can see in the smiling picture my chin is very prominent and grows even longer when I smile, will I need a significant amount of bone to be removed in order to get the results I want? I have added a couple of pics to show u, will the skin sag if a large amount of bone is removed? Thanks!!

Doctor Answers 4

Chin surgery.

The dynamics of your smile show the projection may be due to soft tissue( muscle and fat) over the chin bone. Therefore you will need a through evaluation with 3-D CT scans and properly planned procedure to balance your nose and chin. Too much bone removal can cause disastrous result later in your life . 


Los Angeles Facial Plastic Surgeon

Chin Reduction

Your chin excess is more soft tissue than it is bone. But both will need to be reduced for a saisfactory reduction. This can only be reliably done through a submental approach where the soft tissue excess can be most effectively removed. Chin reduction and rhinoplasty can be done during the same surgery.

Type of Chin Surgery

Thank you for your pictures.  I agree that a rhinoplasty will help improve your facial profile.  The excess of your chin may be due to bone but it is more likely due to excess skin/muscle (soft tissue).  A physical exam would determine the true nature of the chin concerns and if any procedure would help this especially if this due to soft tissue.

Rhinoplasty and chin surgery

The non-smiling photographs demonstrates a normal chin position, so a very close evaluation is required of the bone and soft tissue of the chin. Chin surgery is not performed upon animation, only at rest. A rhinoplasty procedure can address shaving down the dorsal hump, lifting the tip, and releasing the depressor septi ligament which pulls the tip down when smiling. For more information and many examples, please see the link and video below

William Portuese, MD
Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 129 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.