Restore Dorsal Hump?

I recently had a septorhinoplasty to correct a deviated septum and crooked nose. My dorsal hump was softened to a great degree that my appearance has changed -- something I did not desire or ask for. Not too much of the bone was removed... there is a very small hump... barely noticeable. Is it possible for things to return to normal with no complications or long term side effects? I feel a little hopeless.

Doctor Answers 7


I have personally done this on a patient who lost much of her nose in a previous rhinoplasty.  Using various kinds of cartilage grafts it is certainly possible.  You will need to wait a year or so.

Boston Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 24 reviews


Dear reallysad123, It is very important to have imaging performed before a procedure to ensure that you and your surgeon are on the same page regarding the proposed results. This allows you to see the changes and how they will look with your facial aesthetics before moving forward with surgery. At this  point since you have recently had surgery you will need to wait one year from the original procedure to consider a revision to restore the dorsal hump. Ensure that your surgeon performs natural looking ethnic rhinoplasty results by reviewing the before and after photographs. Examples in the link below and video above. Best regards, Michael V. Elam, M.D.

Michael Elam, MD
Orange County Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 196 reviews

Restoring Dorsal Hump after Rhinoplasty

Fullness can be added to your dorsal profile if desired. You said you recently had surgery; I would wait at least 9-10 months after your original operation before evaluating your results and making any decisions about a revision.

Richard W. Fleming, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 38 reviews

Restore dorsal hump

Yes it is possible. If your surgery was recent (within the past 1 year), I would recommend waiting until a full year has passed. In the meantime, you can add height to the bridge with filler, which is a temporary solution. You can also decide to never have surgery and just add filler to the bridge to add height. Filler results typically last 9 months. Make sure to go to a specialist for a nonsurgical or surgical rhinoplasty. Good luck. Best, DR H 

Sanaz Harirchian, MD
Houston Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 11 reviews

Restoring a dorsal hump

Revision rhinoplasty is designed to correct something that was done during a primary rhinoplasty.  Noses can be built up to be larger, or have cartilage removed to make a nose smaller.  See an experienced revision rhinoplasty specialist to see your results.  You may even be a candidate for nonsurgical rhinoplasty, where a filler is injected into the bridge of the nose to recreate the dorsal hump you lost.

Restore dorsal hump

It can be quite difficult to make your nose look exactly as it did before. The dorsum was probably taken down with a  rasp an scissors, and the bones were lily infractured.  Good luck.

Steven Wallach, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
4.1 out of 5 stars 24 reviews

Dorsal Hump Restoration

Thank you for your question. I am sorry to hear that you dislike your early results.  Whether this was an unexpected secondary change during functional surgery or the result of a desired aesthetic change that was more dramatic than desired, communicate your concerns with your surgeon.  He should be able to address your concerns. Additionally, you should give yourself plenty of time to heal as the swelling will continue to decrease and the outcome will change over the next 12-24 months.  If the final result is still not to your liking, then yes, you can undergo a revision procedure and attempt to recreate the profile you had before. I hope this helps. Take care.  

Robert Brobst, MD
Dallas Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 5 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.