Bottoming out? (Photo)

Three weeks post op. does my left look like starting to bottom out? crease was naturally a tiny bit 1cm lower than other breast. just want to see if it looks like positioned right

Doctor Answers 16

Bottoming out? (Photo)

From the photos you posted, you don't appear to be bottoming out.  Being just 3 weeks post-op, you look like you are on track in the healing process.  Be sure to talk with your surgeon at your follow up visits about any concerns so they can be addressed right then when you can be examined.  Otherwise, keep in mind that they will continue to change in shape over the next several months.  ac


Newport Beach Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 5 reviews

Are your breasts bottoming out?

You should make an appointment with your surgeon for an in person consultation. If you are bottoming out then here is some information which could help you.

Large Implants due to their weight, gravity, thinning of tissues, chronically not wearing a bra, loss of elasticity and other factors may cause continued stretching so that your breast implant is no longer supported in its ideal position. This results in the progressive lowering of the inferior breast crease (inframammary fold). When the implant moves South to an undesired inferior position it results in the loss of volume and flattening of the upper pole of the breast, too much volume at the lower pole, increasing the distance from the fold to the nipple and finally the nipple position being abnormally high ( pointing up) and not centered. Similarly, the pocket can also stretch to the side (lateral) so that when lying down your implants fall towards your arm pits or sides, causing the “Side Boobs” appearance.
Bottoming out and Side Boobs Contributing Factors:
  1. Larger/Heavier Implants
  2. Implants placed above the pectoralis muscle
  3. Chronically not wearing a bra when upright
  4. Over dissection of the Implant Pocket
  5. Smooth Implants
  6. Large swings of weight including pregnancy
  7. Skin and soft tissue laxity, loss of elasticity
#bottomingout
#breastaugmentation

No Bottoming Out in Sight

Thanks for you question. From the photos you submitted, it does not appear there is any "bottoming out." As you mentioned, you had a slight asymmetry before that may now be more apparent. It is important that you wear support to decrease the chances of the extra weight of the implants causing a bottoming out effect. Give it some time for your implants to "settle," and check with your surgeon if you still have concerns. Best wishes.

Nice early result

It is hard to determine from photos and without an exam, but it looks as if you have a very nice early result from your breast augmentation.  The folds look even in the photos.  Additionally, the upper poles of the breasts look symmetrical, indicating that the implants are symmetrically positioned on the two sides.  I.e., not bottoming out. 

Share your concerns with your Plastic Surgeon, but I think you need to be a little more patient with the healing process.

Bottoming out?

Bottoming out can only be judged over time;
normal (early) healing leads to changes, not always symmetrical.
Bottoming out is a deviation from the normal and can be attributable to many factors.
Why do you suspect bottoming out?
Perhaps you had a preexisiting asymmetry?

Andrew Kornstein, MD, FACS
New York Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 13 reviews

No bottomimg out

Your breasts look nice in the photos. The left one does not look like it is bottoming out. Best of luck with your long term results.

Steven Wallach, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
4.1 out of 5 stars 24 reviews

Bottoming out?

Thank you for your question.

The photos look like you got a great result.  You are very early in the healing process to see any bottoming out.  Keep doing everything you have doing, as you heal you will see asymmetries from side to side that is normal.  If you notice any drastic changes, then it would be wise to discuss with your surgeon. Good luck.

Francis Johns, MD
Greensburg Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 60 reviews

Breast Augmentation Recovery

Based on your photos, you look as if you are healing nicely. It can take anywhere from 3-6 months for your breasts to fully heal and settle into their new position so there's no need for concern. Relax and enjoy your new breasts. They look terrific. 

Sheila S. Nazarian, MD
Beverly Hills Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 52 reviews

Bottoming out?

Hi Kacie, it looks like you got a great result.  There does not appear to be any bottoming out on your photos.  If you have any concerns, you should discuss with your PS on your next follow up visit.

Rigo Mendoza, MD
Tampa Plastic Surgeon
4.3 out of 5 stars 34 reviews

Bottoming Out

Thank you for your question and congratulations on your recent surgery! To answer your question, no, it does not appear that you are bottoming out, but an in person check up with your plastic surgeon will be your best resource. 

Your implants appear to be in good position with the IMF of your left breast just slightly lower than the right, as described preoperatively. Keep in mind you are still early in the recovery process and your implants can continue to settle for 3-6 months. Best of luck to you!

F. Mark Owsley, MD
Coeur d'Alene Plastic Surgeon
4.1 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.