I'm afraid my columella is bigger than before and one nostril is bigger than the other. (photos)

I had a surgery for my deviated septum and for hump removel. I told my doctor that the only thing I wanted was to remove the hump, but she told me that by doing that, my nose would look slimmer, so she said it was better to do a little work on the tip as well, so it wouldn't appear so bulbous after the hump removel. I had surgery 5days ago. I know is too soon, but my columella is so much bigger than before. And the nostrils are different from each other. Do you think it looks ok? Thank you

Doctor Answers 3

Rhinoplasty, some advices:

Thank you very much for sharing your concerns with us.

The harmony between facial parts makes us instinctively recognize the beauty... without knowing it, without defining it, just a perception that surprises and captivates us.

In this regard, I suggest perform a Closed Rhinoplasty (without visible scars) to treat the tip, base and nasal bridge.
With this procedure you get a delicate nose, better harmonize with your other facial features.

Dr. Emmanuel Mallol Cotes.-

Dominican Republic Plastic Surgeon
4.7 out of 5 stars 147 reviews


First, you are fresh post-op and very swollen,. Second, your nostrils were asymmetric before surgery as well. Best of luck. Be patient and allow things to settle down.

Steven Wallach, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
4.1 out of 5 stars 24 reviews

Columella appears larger after surgery.

At only 5 days after your surgery, you are very early in your healing process.  There is still swelling of your tissues which will resolve over the next several weeks.  Your nostrils had some asymmetry before your procedure but look quite equal in your post op views.  Be patient, address your concerns with your surgeon and wait for the swelling to subside.

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.