Would a chin implant help my weak jaw issue?

I just got a rhinoplasty and am really happy with how it's improved my profile, but my weak jaw is ruining the overall result. Over the past few years I've noticed my chin receding. I suffer from tmj and am a left-sided jaw clencher, this seems to have resulted in one side of my face looking 'dropped' and an increasingly weak, receded jaw/chin. Would a chin implant give me a sharper jawline and reduce the fat pocket you can see under my chin (I'm a fit skinny person so this isnt weight related)?

Doctor Answers 5

Chin Augmentation

You would need to submit pictures to get an informed opinion about your need for chin augmentation. Your pictures should then undergo computer imaging so you can determine if chin augmentation offers an improvement.

Chin implant can improve weak jaw

Chin implants are one of my favorite procedures to perform. If your chin appears weak, there is no way to improve it with diet and exercise. An implant, or possibly filler (though temporary) is a great option. There is also a way to cut the chin bone and advance it, but that is a more involved operation. Photos or an in person consultation would be needed to see which option is best for your specific situation. *Opinions stated here are only opinions. They are not based on a clinical exam, which is recommended.

Darrick E. Antell, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.6 out of 5 stars 28 reviews

Chin implant after rhinoplasty

The short answer to your question is an emphatic yes, the chin implant can definitely help supplement the improved profile of the face from your rhinoplasty.  A chin implant is the most common secondary procedure done at the same time as a rhinoplasty as the profile of the entire face, and the subsequent look and outcome of the nose, is affected by the amount of chin projection.  The longer answer would require a detailed review of your photos and a consultation to evaluate your occlusion (bite) among other things, then selecting a specific type and size of chin implant that would be best for your specific situation.  Best of luck.

Douglas K. Henstrom, MD
Iowa City Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 13 reviews

You might also like...

Would a chin implant help my weak jaw issue?

 Hi, I have performed many Chin Augmentations using chin implants for over 30 years.  Non smiling photos of your face from the front and side would help in the evaluation.  A weak chin creates an imbalance making the nose appear larger, the mid face top heavy and the lower face look short that de-emphasizes the lips and allows early formation of a double chin.  Chin augmentation using a chin implant will add projection to the chin creating harmony and balance to the lower face.  I have found that placement of a silastic chin implant, through a small curved incision under the chin (also allows excess skin removal) to be very safe, quick, highly effective and far less invasive than a sliding genioplasty.  I perform chin implant surgery in 30 minutes or less, often using a local anesthetic alone.  

Hope this helps.

Francis R. Palmer, III, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.6 out of 5 stars 24 reviews

Chin Implant

Thank you for your question. Is it possible to upload pictures of your chin to better help your question get answered. It is not possible to fully answer your question without seeing you in person for a consultation. However, it is common that people get both a rhinoplasty and chin implant together to balance out their face. If you feel you need to balance out your face after getting a rhinoplasty procedure then you should start by consulting with your board certified plastic surgeon. They can help you determine what needs to be done to achieve the look you are going for.
Wish you all the best,Dr. Mentz

Henry Mentz, MD, FACS
Houston Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 31 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.