How does the human nose change as we age?

I am 20 years old and used to have such a sweet, cute little nose. When I was about 15 it was a normal, nice healthy adult nose. Then I broke it and everything went downhill. I started having breathing difficulties and constantly having to blow/sniff to breathe. The shape still looks normal so I DO NOT wish to have surgery. But I'm just wondering, what's going to happen over time? Could it heal back to it's normal inner shape in 10 years? It looks the same on the outside? Will it get bigger?

Doctor Answers 2

The nose tends to stretch out and sometimes droop with aging.

Dear rosiecon12 in Beverly Hills, California:      You have clearly outlined your issues in prior questions and I think you have had excellent answers from myself and the other surgeons who have weighed in.  if you do not wish to have the surgery, of course, that is your choice.  How the nose is going to look in 10 years or so is hard to say.  Sometimes noses look bigger as one gets older, but typically it does not happen until the 5th or 6th decade of life.  The tissues stretch out and sometimes a nose that was not quite as long before, looks long.  If you have an active muscle that pulls the tip down, that will accentuate that imperfection.  It sounds like you should not wait to at least get the breathing fixed, so check into that. 
Best wishes, Robert Kotler, MD, FACS Over 4,500 nasal procedures performed

Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 83 reviews

Nasal obstruction after trauma

There are many reasons that can cause nasal obstruction on the inside of the nose. These include a deviated nasal septum, turbinate hypertrophy, valve collapse, vestibular stenosis, allergies, and chronic sinusitis. Each one of these issues is treated differently with  either medications and/or surgery, after a formal examination of the internal portion of the nose.

William Portuese, MD
Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.7 out of 5 stars 126 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.