Do the lower later cartilage lose their strength when reshaped?

I had a revision over 4 months ago. LLCs were reshaped and moved. My tip was derotated and the LLCs were lowered down into my alar rims, near the very base. I need the lower lateral cartilages returned to their proper spot as what I have now is aesthetically very off. So my question is: do the lower lateral cartilage lose or maintain their strength when reshaped/repositioned? Thanks for your help.

Doctor Answers 3

Do the lower later cartilage lose their strength when reshaped?

Maybe yes. Maybe No. It all depends on the specific techniques the previous surgeon(s) used during your procedure.. 


Downey Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 16 reviews

Lower lateral cartilage shape and strength?

Lower lateral cartilage shape and strength? it depends on how prior surgery was done and the skill and experience of the revision surgeon. 

Toby Mayer, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.7 out of 5 stars 32 reviews

The control of (LLC's) Nasal Tip is the most complex part of the rhinoplasty procedure.

At four months you should start seeing evidence of your desired outcome. Without attached images it is difficult to be specific with this answer. 

However what you are describing is a very complex maneuver on a already somewhat unpredictable region of the nasal anatomy, especially in a secondary procedure.  I am a proponent of tip grafts, and strut grafts to better control this region when performing a tip reshaping.  With what you describe I am unclear if this was performed or not.  By just managing the LLC's alone in complex maneuvers I have found a degree of unpredictability. At four months your tissue is still in the early phase of your final result. Please be patient, and maintain open communication with your surgeon.

 I wish you the best,

Sergio P. Maggi, MD, FACS

drmaggi.com

Austin Plastic Surgery Center

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.