What does a "bulbous tip" mean?

I posted a photo of my nose and surgeons said I had a bulbous tip. What does that mean?

Doctor Answers 4

Generally good much cartilage and possibly thick skin.

Dear rosiecon12 in Beverly Hills, California      I am sorry I did not get a chance to see your photo that was posted previously.  Typically, people with bulbous tips have enlarged tip cartilages and often thick skin covering them.  Shaving and shaping the cartilage is routine for rhinoplasty.  The skin may be a more difficult issue.  Thick, heavy, oily skin does not contract after the cartilage is removed and, therefore, often the results are not quite as well defined as either patient or surgeon would want.  This is why a comprehensive consultation is warranted for you.  The bulbous tip, the nostril collapse, and the mid vault collapse, and all of the issues you are concerned about should be addressed.  Frankly, why worry about them when you can get answers at consultations.  You want to do your homework before consultation.  Prepare well for your consultation.  When you search, look for rhinoplasty super-specialists.  These are surgeons whose practice is the majority or entirely devoted to rhinoplasty, septoplasty, and related procedures.  This would include both primary and revision rhinoplasty surgery.  Why not have the most specialized talent in your service?  Consider how much experience the surgeon has doing the procedure you are considering. We all get better at what we do with time and so those surgeons who have a long run of experience are the ones who have learned the most from experience. Residency and fellowship are where the learning begins, but for all of us, time and experience is where the education continues. Part of your preparation for consultation should be preparing a list of questions beforehand.  Bring a notepad or iPad or laptop with you and take notes as the surgeon answers the question you are asking.  You should spend more time with the surgeon than with the office administrative staff, because you need to get a sense of whether you are comfortable with the doctor.  You should not feel rushed that you are on a consultation conveyer belt.  If the presentation by the office staff seems a bit to “salesie” that is a bit of a yellow or red light.  Take a friend or relative along since two heads are better than one in gaining information and understanding.  In the end, the purpose of the consultation is for you to be educated and be comfortable, not to be “ sold”.  Ask yourself two key questions: “Is this surgeon teaching me or selling?” And secondly, “Can I put my life and my face into this particular surgeon’s hands? Can I trust him/her?” There are excellent books out there that you can read and use to study up. It is worth the homework time you put in up front so that you make the right decision with respect to choosing a surgeon who has the talent, experience, and degree of super-specialization that you certainly want to have.  When you visit doctor’s websites, the most important feature on the site is the before and after gallery.  If there are just a few examples of rhinoplasty or revision rhinoplasty, you wonder how much experience the surgeon has performing such surgeries.  There need to be dozens and dozens of examples.  The more examples there are, the more likely you will see one or more that demonstrate situations similar to yours.  Look closely at the photos for natural results.  That is what you want.  Nobody wants to carry a sign saying “I have had a rhinoplasty.”      Reviews on review sites, particularly RealSelf are very important and should be carefully digested. The larger the number of reviews the most accurate the picture of the practice and particularly the doctor. A consensus is generally correct.      A consultation without computer imaging is, in my opinion, of much less value.  Why shouldn’t you see the predicted result of the procedure the doctor is proposing?  At consultation, photos are taken of you and loaded into a computer system that morphs your present appearance into the anticipated “after” based on the nasal surgeons input.  Imaging is an incomparable learning tool because it provides a forum for doctor and patient agreement on what would satisfy the patient and what is, in the doctor’s opinion, achievable.  After all, cosmetic surgery is 100% visual.  It is about appearance, so without a visual evidence of what is planned, how can you make a decision as to whether or not you might be satisfied.  Talking about it is worthless.  To anticipate a successful outcome, there must be a meeting of the minds between surgeon and patient.  Best wishes, Robert Kotler, MD, FACS Over 4,500 nasal procedures performed

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Round Nasal Tip

Generally a round tip is referred to as a "bulbous tip." Most people find a more refined tip aesthetically pleasing. This is something that can be achieved through rhinoplasty

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The shape of a bulbous tip

A bulbous nasal tipped nose is generally one  looks more rounded at the end or tip on the nose. In some people it can be apparent where is looks like a small ball is positioned on the end of the nose. A bulbous tip maybe one of the most sought after reasons to undergo rhinoplasty surgery. Most rhinoplasty patients with a bulbous nasal tip describe their nose as being too wide or too big. The majority of patients feel that their bulbous nose or tip lacks definition or shape.

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What is a bulbous tip?

"Bulbous tip" refers to the appearance of the tip of the nose when it is ball or bulb like. The bulbous tip lacks definition and has little detail. Rhinoplasty surgery can correct a bulbous tip and create a more narrow and defined look.

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These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.