Could JAK inhibitors cure my condition? (photos)

I am 21 years old male my hair started to fall in my 18, now I have in the bald area some tiny hair but they doen't grow, and I think its hereditary in my family.But I dont have full beard yet and I know that dht should make beard to grow if that is the case of my hair loss.my question is jak could be a cure for me and if I use minoxidil and propecia for 3 months only it will stop my hair loss or I will continue to loss hair?

Doctor Answers 2

JAK inhibitors

JAK inhibitors include tofacitinib snd ruxolitinib. They are available as off label treatments but I generally only consider them in exceptional cases of refractory or "non responding" alopecia areata. I have been using these drugs for about 18 months.
The JAK inhibitors are certainly not the right drug for you right now. They have potential side effects and must be used long term. It's not a drug you start for a few weeks and then stop. They are generally reserved for those with advanced alopecia areata at the present time - not yet for other types of hair loss.
Most hair loss treatments need to be used long term in order to be beneficial so the answer to your question is no - three months use is not likely to be sufficient.

JAK inhibitors

Jak inhibitors are not available yet in the market. For your beard, many young men want to accelerate their beard growth and ask about it. It takes age (genetic triggers which occur in family lines) so if you want to find out when your beard will grow out, you need to find out when your father or grandfather started to grow their beard. Hormones should have kicked in nicely by the time a man reaches 18 but he must wait out his genetics as hormone alone are not responsible for the onset of beard grown. Beard transplants can be done when the young man is a bit older (over 25) if the beard has not grown in yet

William Rassman, MD
Los Angeles Hair Restoration Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 27 reviews

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