When can I return to yoga?

I practice yoga at least 2-3 times a week. When would I be in the clear to continue to practice after my breast augmentation?

Doctor Answers 8

When can I return to yoga?

Thank you for the question. Most plastic surgeons will individualize their “return to activity” schedules for specific patients depending on exactly what operation was performed and how recovery is progressing. Therefore, you will be best off asking your plastic surgeon what his/her reasoning is behind the instructions.  Online consultants, not knowing  the details of what operation was done  for you  will not be appropriate resources. Best wishes for an outcome that you will be very pleased with.

Yoga Post BA

Your Plastic Surgeon should be able to let you know when you can return to your usual activities. in my practice I advise patients to avoid cardio for three weeks and upper body work outs for an additional 3 weeks. You should expect to return to all of your regular exercise when healed.  Talk to your Plastic Surgeon about what to expect as you heal.
All the best

When can I return to yoga

Depending on how you do Yoga, I would say at least 2 weeks, and if you are very advanced, I would say 3-4 weeks.

Julio Garcia, MD
Las Vegas Plastic Surgeon
4.7 out of 5 stars 21 reviews

When can I return to yoga?

When you have surgery, it is important that you carefully follow all your surgeon's instructions, not those of other doctors. But in general, depending on the details of the surgery, probably 6-8 weeks.

Ronald V. DeMars, MD
Portland Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 24 reviews

When can I return to yoga after breast augmentation

There are many elements which need to be answered before considering what your activity level can safely be following breast augmentation surgery. Did your surgeon put the implants pre-pectoral or retro-pectoral. Or said differently, are your implants in front or behind your chest muscle. This will impact how uncomfortable you are with arm motion. In addition, the position placement of the implants is important and keeping them there following surgery can be a variable based on whether or not extensive "window shading" was performed at the time of surgery. Often implants will ride high ir not settle adequately unless extensive pocket manipulation is performed whereby the pectoralis muscle is released and allowed to "window shade" upwards. This allows for the implant to settle into an aesthetic ptotic (or droop) position. Doing this however can result in significantly more post operative discomfort and a larger pocket dissection. Accurately placed bra support at this time is an integral part of the post operative care. Excessive chest wall manipulation in this period may put undue stress on the forming breast capsule which will be essential for long term positioning of the implant. In short.... Don't rush your return to Yoga if you are not ready......

Follow Your Surgeon's Instructions

Thanks for your question. After breast augmentation, it's important to give the muscles in your upper body plenty of time to heal. That means that you'll need to take several weeks off from exercise, including just about every yoga pose — and that's in addition to the week you'll spend recuperating at home. Only your surgeon knows the specifics of your procedure, though, so it's important to bring it up in follow-up visits before resuming your yoga practice. 

James N. Romanelli, MD, FACS
Long Island Plastic Surgeon
4.6 out of 5 stars 22 reviews

When can I return to yoga?

Every Surgeon has his/her own post-op protocol, as well as every patient is different when it comes to healing. Please, discuss this with your Operating Surgeon- he/she will be the best person to advise you on this

Breast Augmentation/Breast Implants/Anatomic Gummy Bear Implants/ Silicone Implants/Breast Implant Revision

I appreciate your question. I would recommend that you discuss this question with your surgeon as every surgeon has their own respective post op protocol for his/her patients.  Your surgeon is your best resource as he/she is most familiar with your medical history and how you are healing at this time. The best way to assess and give true advice would be an in-person exam. Please see a board-certified plastic surgeon that specializes in aesthetic and restorative plastic surgery. Best of luck! Dr. Schwartz Board Certified Plastic Surgeon Director-Beverly Hills Breast and Body Institute #RealSelf100Surgeon

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.