How many months of not smoking is safe for surgery and does weed count?

Doctor Answers 4

Tummy Tuck/Abdominoplasty/Liposuction/Vaser High Definition Procedures/Tummy Tuck Revision

I appreciate your question.
I require that my patients stop smoking 8 weeks before surgery as well as 8 weeks after surgery. And yes, marajuana counts.
The best way to assess and give true advice would be an in-person exam.
Please see a board-certified plastic surgeon that specializes in aesthetic and restorative plastic surgery.
Best of luck!
Dr. Schwartz
Board Certified Plastic Surgeon
Director-Beverly Hills Breast and Body Institute
#RealSelf100Surgeon

Smoking and surgery...

4 weeks of cessation is suggested to help minimize risks from your procedure.  As for starting up afterwards, once the wounds are 'healed', smoking is no longer an issue for my or my patients.  And marijuana is still considered smoking.  The type of surgery will also determine what restrictions you will have regarding smoking with facelift, tummy tucks, and breast reduction/mastopexy being the most concerning in my practice.

Curtis Wong, MD
Redding Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 32 reviews

Smoking before surgery

The risks and effects of smoking prior to and during recovery after plastic surgery are significant. Smoking — specifically nicotine and carbon monoxide — impedes the body’s ability to deliver oxygen to tissues. As a result, the healing process after plastic surgery is negatively affected. Healing after plastic surgery has a significant effect on the quality of your result. See the below link for more information.

Tummy Tuck and Smoking

You will find different surgeons have different requirements. For my tummy tuck patients, I want them to quit all smoking at least 4 weeks before and 4 weeks after surgery. I am glad to hear that you are aware of the danger smoking has on the healing process. Good luck.

Miguel Delgado, MD
San Francisco Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 68 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.