I'm 6 month post op breast aug. why haven't my implants dropped and are still high and hard? (photos)

Doctor Answers 8

Post BA position

the implants are very high and usually drop within 6-8 weeks.  However, your do not appear so and this can be a component of the breast pocket dissection, or less likely, very early contracture that impeded the descent.  You will need a revision operation to correct and should see your surgeon.


Salt Lake City Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 4 reviews

Implants too high 6 months post op

Thank you for submitting your pictures. It would be really helpful to see your before pictures. By six months post op, implants should be in their normal position. I would bring up your concerns with your surgeon. To me your implants look too high and your nipples  too low. In my opinion the implants chosen were too big for your breast anatomy.  Good luck. 

Mehdi K. Mazaheri, MD
Scottsdale Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 20 reviews

Implant Malposition

Hello,


The position of your implants is problematic for this stage in your recovery. The implants will typically move down from this position within the first few months. I recommend that you see your Plastic Surgeon in person to talk about next steps for revision.


All the best

Sagging

It would be beneficial to see your preoperative photos to understand what degree of sagging you had prior to placement of the implants.  At 6 months, it is not likely these implants are going to "drop".  It appears from the photos that you maybenefit from a breast lift in addition to revision of the implant pockets.  Speak with your surgeon.  If you are unhappy with the answer, seek a second opinion.

James D. Frost, MD
Pensacola Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 10 reviews

Please send before pictures

I am sorry about the results of your augmentation. The pictures before surgery would help us to see the degree of sagging before surgery. Your implants are very high  and will need revision surgery to lower them. You may need to have lift too based on our before surgery nipple position.

Kamran Khoobehi, MD
New Orleans Plastic Surgeon
4.7 out of 5 stars 112 reviews

I'm 6 month post op breast aug. why haven't my implants dropped and are still high and hard?

Thank you for sharing your question and photographs and I am sorry to hear of your recovery difficulties.  Without seeing preoperative photographs it is difficult to offer definite advice but based on the fas that both implants are affected this appears to be a situation where the implant pocket was not large enough for the implant size selected, preventing stretching of the breast skin envelope and redistribution of the implant volume to round out the lower breast.  See your surgeon for an in-person evaluation to discuss possible revision procedures such as enlarging your breast implant pocket or reducing your implant size.  Best wishes. 

Nelson Castillo, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 43 reviews

Encapsulation

It is possible you have suffered capsular contracture although bilateral encapsulation is more rare.  I would recommend a capsulectomy and exchange of implants, placing them in a lower position on your chest wall.   Your nipples are also very low on your breasts and therefore you may benefit from a lift, but usually a better implant placement should take care of this.  Best wishes, Dr. T. 

Post Op

Good Question. It would help to see your before pictures. Your nipple position looks very low, which causes your implant to look too high. Your implants could also be too large for your frame, causing them to look like they have not dropped. In a perfect world I want your nipple in the very middle of that implant, and your nipple now is at the very bottom. You could possibly think about a breast lift (mastopexy) down the road. Good luck!

Ed Breazeale, Jr., MD
Knoxville Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.