How to tighten vagina after birth naturally?

Baby birth after how to tight vaginal, in naturally with out surgery

Doctor Answers 5

Pelvic floor exercises

Congratulations on your delivery.

At this point I would recommend reviewing with your Ob/Gyn proper Kegel techniques.  I would also consider other medical devices to help build up the pelvic floor such as the Apex and or intensity.  These are great medical devices that help to strengthen the pelvic floor and they really work well.

Best of luck

Non-surgical vaginal tightening

The first step in regaining pelvic floor strength and vaginal function for all post-partum women should be pelvic floor exercises. You may do this on your own, know as Kegel exercises, but I'm sure you've already tried that. Following childbirth, there is both muscular and nerve trauma, and thus everyone new mom would benefit from pelvic floor rehabilitation. This could be done by going to a physical therapist which may be costly if your insurance doesn't cover it. Alternatively, there are now numerous devices you can use on your own such as those made by In-Control (Apex and Intensity). There is also a phone app,, you can use to do biofeedback on your own. A detailed list of options are listed in the link below.

If you already perform excellent kegel's then Laser Vaginal Resurfacing  with the CO2 Laser, FemiLift, would provide you with increased vaginal sensation, tightness, and reduced urinary incontinence and dryness. This is an in-office, painless procedure which I offer for vaginal tightening and/or urinary stress incontinence. We've seen great results, in fact, please read the latest testimonials posted on RealSelf.

Best of luck,

Oscar A. Aguirre, MD

Pelvic Surgery & Intimate Aesthetics®

The Center for Female Pelvic Medicine and Cosmetic Surgery®

Oscar A. Aguirre, MD
Denver Urogynecologist
5.0 out of 5 stars 21 reviews

Kegels and a Swiss ball

You can strengthen your vaginal muscles (aka levator ani, PC muscles) with both active exercises (Kegels), and isotonic contractions. Everybody knows about Kegels, but to do them well you need to use biofeedback and a structured exercise routine just like you would in the gym. Biofeedback consists of a pressure sensor in the vagina that tells you if you're achieving an adequate contraction; it doesn't need to be anything fancy. Used in an exercise program, the muscles will tone up well. The Swiss ball offers another method to target the vaginal muscles. By simply sitting on the ball for at least 15 minutes daily, you force the levator muscles to produce an isotonic contraction - you won't feel anything, but it happens automatically in the same way that your leg muscles contract when you're standing. Don't expect magical results in regard to vaginal tightening during sex with any of these exercises, but they do improve incontinence in many women.

Strengtheninig pelvic floor muscles after vaginal delivery

To strengthen your vagina muscles without any surgical or physician guided non-surgical intervention, the most effective way is to be able to perform effectively pelvic floor exercises ( Kegel exercises ). It is very important to be able to identify certain pelvic floor muscles during the process in order to train them correctly. There are FDA approved devices, which may be helpful in providing guidance to do them right. In addition you may consider to use vaginal cones once you are successful in getting your pelvic floor ( vagina) muscles strong enough to keep the cones in. If the natural way is not effective, next step would be one of the non-surgical options ( laser, radio-frequency or other technology) available in physician offices. 

Best wishes,

Yvonne Wolny, MD

Kegel exercises

Thanks for the question.  The most natural way to attempt tightening the vagina after pregnancy is to attempt Kegel exercises.  This is a life long commitment just like any diet or exercise regimen.  Hope this helps.  Just google Kegel exercises.

J R Miklos MD

Atlanta ~ Beverly Hills ~ Dubai

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.