Is an Areola Reduction possible for me if I get a Donut Mastopexy? (photos)

Im in my late twenties and I really want to get an areola reduction. I am currently a 34C and I think I may also have tuberous breasts according to what I have seen from other pictures as well. I am not really interested in a lift right now. I am much more concerned with decreasing the size of my areolas since they are so big. So I am wondering will it be possible to achieve this with a donut mastopexy? Thank you for all your input and help in advance!

Doctor Answers 16

Lipo-lift

I appreciate your question.

I perform a liposuction breast lift that removes tissue from the areas you don't want such as near the armpit and the lower portion hanging near your stomach. Once I use this to shape the breast I then remove the skin to tighten the breast and create a better shape with nice cleavage. Since I perform this less invasively the recovery time is faster. The size would depend on the proportion with your body versus going for a cup size.

The best way to assess and give true advice would be an in-person exam.  Please see a board-certified plastic surgeon that specializes in aesthetic plastic surgery.

 

Best of luck!

   

Dr. Schwartz

Board Certified Plastic Surgeon

#RealSelf100Surgeon

#RealSelfCORESurgeon

Breast lift / areola reduction

A donut lift would tend to flatten your breasts and risk widening the areola over time.  Better to consider a lollipop scar breast lift to achieve your goals.  Be sure to consult with an experienced board certified plastic surgeon.  Good luck! 

Zachary Farris, MD, FACS
Dallas Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 16 reviews

Is an Areola Reduction possible for me if I get a Donut Mastopexy?

The areolae can be reduced with a donut lift, but there will be little benefit in the form of a lift.  In addition, the donut lifts may have the tendency to put you at risk for widening areolae.

Is an Areola Reduction possible for me if I get a Donut Mastopexy

The doughnut mastopexy scar is the scar that will be required to reduce the areola size, but the mastopexy part will likely be small.

Julio Garcia, MD
Las Vegas Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 26 reviews

Reshaping the Areola with the Donut Lift

The Donut Lift is one of my preferred incisions. As an overall summary of the breast lift, the procedure is done on an outpatient basis under intravenous sedation and local or general anesthesia. As mentioned above there are a variety of techniques for these operations.  Lollipop lift (vertical lift), donut (periareola) lift, Benelli lift, crescent lift, anchor lift (inverted T). Most commonly, we prefer the lollipop or donut lift because of the shape, small scars and easier healing. Although the “anchor-shape” or inverted “T” incision is still more popular in the United States, it represents an older technique with extensive scarring and a less optimal result in many cases. These newer techniques are utilized in the vast majority of cases, the rare exception being extremely large breasts. The nipple-areola complex is repositioned higher, the excess skin is removed, and the breast is reshaped in a pleasing contour and in a more normal position.

The crescent lift removes a small amount of skin at the top of the areola. We find that there is very little lift and the areola becomes oval in shape and distorted with this method. I prefer to use a #shortscar technique, #LollipopScar or #DonutLift” rather than the majority of surgeons in the United States that use an anchor pattern lift which involve more significant scarring.

Jed H. Horowitz, MD, FACS
Orange County Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 96 reviews

Is an Areola Reduction possible for me if I get a Donut Mastopexy?

If your goal is only to reduce your areola diameter, but not to lift your breast, a donut mastopexy will accomplish this. A donut mastopexy done in an attempt to lift breasts that look like the ones in your pictures will likely fail due to the degree of sagging present. If you don't want to increase your breast size, I believe that you will get a better breast shape with a smaller areola if you do a standard T-scar mastopexy.

It is better a lift whenever you are ready

Hello, thanks so much for your inquiry and for your pictures. As others are saying it is hard to give you a nice natural shape with just a donut mastopexy. It would be more beneficial for you to have a breast lift with implants in order to give you a beautiful result. Of course whenever you are ready.

Please make sure that you and your surgeon are on the same page. Don't forget to discuss all your concerns, options and expectations thoroughly. Have a safe and pleasant PS Journey!
Respectfully,
Dr. Jaime Campos-Leon
Board Certified Plastic Surgeon   

Jaime Campos Leon, MD
Mexico Plastic Surgeon
4.4 out of 5 stars 243 reviews

Donut mastopexy

Thank you for your question and pictures.  Yes, this type of mastopexy will exactly the correct procedure for reducing the areolar size, although without a full lift or implant you may end up with a slighter flatter breast.  Keep this in mind as you make you decision.

Ramiro Morales, Jr., MD
Pembroke Pines Plastic Surgeon
4.6 out of 5 stars 22 reviews

Areola reduction

You have very large areola and may  not be possible to remove all the pigment around the new areola and vertical component of a lift.  You may need  a revision at a later time when the skin loosens up to allow for further removal of the areola.

Steven Wallach, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
4.1 out of 5 stars 24 reviews

No, you need a lift for sure

I would do a standard short inverted T mastopexy. You are not a candidate for a donut lift. Scars tend to fade and are always visible but a bad shape from the wrong operation is a bigger mistake. I think it is important for you to seek out several opinions from board certified plastic surgeons and review their before and after pictures. Good Luck!

Gregory T. Lynam, MD
Richmond Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 55 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.