Will taking out my 625cc saline implants and replacing with 800cc silicone make that much of a difference?

I am 5'8 and 155 lbs. My first BA I did 450cc saline then my 2nd went up to 625cc saline. I'm still not happy enough size wise. My boobs have been big before but due to a weight gain then big weight loss I lost my boobs. I know my implants are considered big but these do not look huge on my frame no one even knows I have fake ones. I want to know if switching to silicone 800cc would make that much of a difference or If it would be a waste of money. Wanting to be a full DD

Doctor Answers 7

Large implants

625 cc implants are quite large enough.  I would not go any larger.  I have seen many women years later with problems from very large implants.  They all say the same thing. "What on earth was I thinking?"


San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 25 reviews

Increasing implant size

Thank you for your question.  This is a common question--how much volume do I need to add to see a difference?  It's hard to say anything definitive without photos or an exam, but often a minimum of 100-150cc is needed to make a significant difference. You will certainly be larger.  Whether it will make you happy, only you can know that answer.



Brian C. Reuben, MD
Salt Lake City Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 30 reviews

Will taking out my 625cc saline implants and replacing with 800cc silicone make that much of a difference?

It's difficult to say without seeing photos. I would recommend reposting your question with photographs. I would make sure that you understand the risks of increasing your implant size beyond what your tissues are meant to handle. This can rapidly thin your breast tissue, and skin, so that you're left with very thin tissues covering your implants. 

Will taking out my 625cc saline implants and replacing with 800cc silicone make that much of a difference?

The simple answer to your question in my opinion is that exchanging from 625 mL to 800 mL will make a moderate difference but not a striking difference.  Changing to silicone from saline will create a more natural feel but beware that eventually there may be a price to be paid as your skin and breast tissue stretches and expands and possibly thins in the future with the added weight and volume of the new implants.  800 mL is currently the largest implant size available in the US and at some point you may need to consider skin reduction through mastopexy and replacement of a smaller implant if you stretch out too much.  Discuss your options with an ABPS board-certified plastic surgeon of your choice and best wishes,

Jon A Perlman M.D., FACS
Diplomate, American Board of Plastic Surgery
Member, American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery (ASAPS)
ABC-TV Extreme Makeover Surgeon
Beverly Hills, California

Jon A. Perlman, MD
Beverly Hills Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 30 reviews

Switching to 800cc silicone

Thank you for your question.  Without at least photos it is difficult to say what 800cc would do for you.  In general though if you go up from 625 to 800 this will be a cup size (or possibly just a tad more).  If you are still concerned after reading these answers I would seek in person consultation appointments with board certified plastic surgeons who perform a lot of breast revision surgeries.  Best of luck to you

Milind K. Ambe, MD
Orange County Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 36 reviews

Enlargement

It is very important to realize the difference between silicone and saline implants. Seek a breast revision specialist on your next surgery. Silicone implants are softer and appear smaller in body when compared side by side with saline 

Stuart A. Linder, MD, FACS
Beverly Hills Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 40 reviews

Will taking out my 625cc saline implants and replacing with 800cc silicone make that much of a difference?

Thank you for the question. 

 Online consultants will not be able to provide you with specific enough advice to be truly helpful.  Ultimately, careful communication of your goals (in my practice I prefer the use of goal pictures, direct examination/communication in front of a full-length mirror, in bra sizers, and computer imaging)  as well as careful measurements (dimensional planning) will be critical.


Generally speaking, the best online advice I can give to ladies who are considering breast augmentation revision surgery ( regarding breast implant size/profile selection) is:


1. Concentrate on choosing your plastic surgeon carefully. Concentrate on appropriate training, certification, and the ability of the plastic surgeon to achieve the results you are looking for. Ask to see lots of examples of his/her work.


2. Have a full discussion and communication regarding your desired goals with your plastic surgeon. This communication will be critical in determining breast implant size/type/profile will most likely help achieve your goals. 

In my practice, the use of photographs of “goal” pictures (and breasts that are too big or too small) is very helpful. For example, I have found that the use of know words such as “much of a difference” or "full DD cup” etc means different things to different people and therefore prove unhelpful.

Also, as you know, cup size varies depending on him who makes the bra; therefore, discussing desired cup size may also be inaccurate. Again, the use of computer imaging has been very helpful during the communication process, in our practice.



3. Once you feel you have communicated your goals clearly, allow your plastic surgeon to use his/her years of experience/judgment to choose the breast implant size/profile that will best meet your goals. Again, in my practice, this decision is usually made during surgery, after the use of temporary intraoperative sizers.

I hope this (and the attached link, dedicated to larger breast augmentation revision surgery concerns) helps. Best wishes for an outcome that you will be very pleased with.

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.