When will I be active again? I had muscle repair 7 weeks ago

I had a large rectus divarication repaired 7 wks ago (no lipo, just muscle repair). Prior to this I was very active. Comp swimming, surfing, running, weights and lots of sport. Wr going to Hawaii at the start of Oct & I'm wondering if I'm going to be able to surf, etc by then? I live in Aus, so this is a big trip for us. I know I've had major surgery, but I just want to know when I'm realistically going to be back to my old self again. Having said all this, I also don't want to ruin my results!

Doctor Answers 5

Recovery time for TT

I tell my patients that for MANY patients it takes a full 6 months after a TT to return to normal.  That being said I will tell you that in my experience the active women (which it sounds like you are) get back faster than the less active women. This seems to hold true for many procedures, but especially TT.  If you are 2 month post op now and your trip is not for another 3 months I would venture to say you will be able to most if not all of the things you have planned in Hawaii.  I ask my diastasis repair patients to refrain from "ab work" for 3 months after surgery and then to work back into it slowly.  You must realize that if you are used to using your core a lot and you do not do so for 3 months...your core will be out of shape, and it will take some work to get back to where you were before surgery.  I make recommendations on an individual basis at my patient's 3 month post op visit depending on the degree of repair and the patients activity level.  Hang in there it will be worth it!!


Nashville Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 49 reviews

When will I be active again? I had muscle repair 7 weeks ago

I always tell my patients to avoid excercise the next 3 months after the Tummy Tuck. You need a proper recovery time. I would recommend you to start excercising the 3rd month very slow and then increase little by little. Every surgeons have their own opinion so you'd better call your plastic surgeon and ask him/her. 

Yily De Los Santos, MD
Dominican Republic Plastic Surgeon
4.3 out of 5 stars 1,633 reviews

Postoperative activity after abdominoplasty dictated by your plastic surgeon.

My practice patients are asked to avoid activity that targets the abdominal muscles for six weeks. After this they gradually increase activity until they are fully athletically active at three months.

Vincent N. Zubowicz, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 32 reviews

Exercise after tummy tuck

Thank you for your question about exercise after your tummy tuck.

It is truly best to ask your surgeon for guidance.
If s/he has none to give - then what I tell my patients is to start back slowly, at only 10% of what they did before surgery, starting 6 weeks after surgery. 

You lose muscle strength and tone rapidly - you don't want to injure the surgery or any other part of your body.
Running and crunches will be the hardest.

If your surgeon lets you surf - be careful. The last thing you want is a muscle cramp in the abdomen out in the open ocean.

Hope you find this answer helpful. Have a great day!

When will I be active again? I had muscle repair 7 weeks ago

Your plastic surgeon will always be your best resource when it comes returning to specific activities. He/she knows exactly what was done and how you are progressing. Generally speaking, tummy tuck surgery is one of those operations that is associated with a very significant recovery period, both from the physical and emotional standpoints. This extensive recovery is often underestimated by both patients and surgeons alike. I try to warn patients that even after a few months they may not be 100% back to their full energy level. Of course, this will vary from one patient to another;  it would behoove you to “listen to your body” and slowly return to full function, again under the guidance of your plastic surgeon. Best wishes; hopefully you will enjoy your vacation regardless of whether you are able to lie on your abdomen (surf) or not.

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.